Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization

Hermes L, Dürr V, Hoinville T (2018)
Proceedings of the German Zoological Society: NB 9.

Kurzbeitrag Konferenz / Poster | Englisch
 
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Abstract / Bemerkung
Tactile exploration of the near-range environment appears ubiquitous in insects. For instance, walking stick insects continuously move their pair of antennae to find footholds for their front legs. Each antenna bears different types of mechanoreceptors, each potentially contributing to touch localization. Among them, Johnston's organ, a chordotonal organ in the pedicel, probably encode contact-induced vibrations. Extracting tactile information from vibrations is a tempting approach for insectoid robots as it requires less wiring than pressure sensor arrays and, in contrast to static force sensing strategies, does not necessitate lasting contact phases. Theory shows that the first vibration modes, i.e. the lowest natural frequencies, are sufficient to estimate the radial distance of hits along a flexible beam. However, in practice, measuring low-frequency components requires proportionally long signal episodes. Not only the resulting latency would impede timely applications, like locomotion control, but also the damped vibrations may vanish too quickly. Hence, it could be beneficial to exploit higher frequency bands. Since beam theory predicts accurately only the few first vibration modes, we experimentally tested whether and which high-frequency bands could be used to estimate the contact distance along a plastic tube rotated by a servomotor. For a range of contact distances, vibrations were sampled with high rate and sensitivity, using a piezoelectric pickup for acoustic guitar, taped to the base of the antenna. Systematically varied bands of the corresponding power spectra were evaluated by support vector regression. We demonstrate that accurate distance estimates can be obtained from various frequency bands, including high-frequency ones
Stichworte
Johnston's Organ; ORGAN; touch; tactile; Environment; INSECTS; insect; Walking; Walking stick; WALKING STICK INSECT; STICK INSECTS; Stick Insect; STICK-INSECT; Antennae; Front Leg; LEGS; leg; Antenna; mechanoreceptors; Mechanoreceptor; localization; chordotonal; Chordotonal Organ; pedicel; Vibration; INFORMATION; robots; robot; Pressure; sensor; sensor arrays; ARRAYS; FORCE; mode; FREQUENCY; distance; latency; Locomotion; Locomotion control; control
Erscheinungsjahr
2018
Art.-Nr.
NB 9
Konferenz
111th Annual Meeting of the German Zoological Society
Konferenzort
Greifswald
Konferenzdatum
2018-09-11 – 2018-09-14
ISSN
0070-4342
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2931674

Zitieren

Hermes L, Dürr V, Hoinville T. Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization. Proceedings of the German Zoological Society. 2018: NB 9.
Hermes, L., Dürr, V., & Hoinville, T. (2018). Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization. Proceedings of the German Zoological Society, NB 9
Hermes, L., Dürr, V., and Hoinville, T. (2018). Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization. Proceedings of the German Zoological Society:NB 9.
Hermes, L., Dürr, V., & Hoinville, T., 2018. Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization. Proceedings of the German Zoological Society, : NB 9.
L. Hermes, V. Dürr, and T. Hoinville, “Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization”, Proceedings of the German Zoological Society, 2018, : NB 9.
Hermes, L., Dürr, V., Hoinville, T.: Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization. Proceedings of the German Zoological Society. : NB 9 (2018).
Hermes, Luca, Dürr, Volker, and Hoinville, Thierry. “Toward a biomimetic Johnston's organ for touch localization”. Proceedings of the German Zoological Society (2018): NB 9.

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