Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns

Pfaff A, Schlarb A (2018)
SOMNOLOGIE 22(3): 175-182.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Autor/in
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Abstract / Bemerkung
BackgroundAdverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can lead to worse sleep quality (SQ) and have an impact on relationships. This study examines the role of sleep on the link between ACEs and romantic relationship quality (RRQ). Additionally, the association between ACEs and romantic relationship patterns and nightmares is investigated.MethodsIn aself-assessment questionnaire survey, ACEs as well as romantic relationship (quality, history, orientation) and sleep patterns (quality, nightmares) were assessed in 300 women aged 18-52years using the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Nightmare Effects Questionnaire, Relationship Orientation Questionnaire, and the Relationship Assessment Scale. Demographic data and number of previous romantic relationships were also assessed.ResultsSQ was found to be asignificant mediator of the relationship between childhood maltreatment (CM) and RRQ. The prediction of RRQ through ACE becomes smaller and non-significant when impaired SQ is accounted for. Neither ageneral history of ACEs nor single types of ACEs predict short-term romantic relationship orientation (preference for short- over long-term romantic relationships). However, overall CM, history of sexual abuse, separation of parents, violence against the mother, substance abuse of ahousehold member, and mental disorder of ahousehold member significantly predict more romantic relationships. Heightened nightmare frequency is predicted by emotional neglect and substance abuse of ahousehold member. More daytime effects of nightmares were also predicted by overall CM.ConclusionAs sleep was found to moderate the link between ACEs and RRQ, therapeutic treatments for CM individuals should target sleep improvement as an important goal. This might not only improve SQ, but also quality of life or romantic relationships.
Stichworte
Life change events; Surveys and questionnaires; Sleep wake disorders; Quality of life; Dreams
Erscheinungsjahr
2018
Zeitschriftentitel
SOMNOLOGIE
Band
22
Ausgabe
3
Seite(n)
175-182
ISSN
1432-9123
eISSN
1439-054X
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2931521

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Pfaff A, Schlarb A. Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns. SOMNOLOGIE. 2018;22(3):175-182.
Pfaff, A., & Schlarb, A. (2018). Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns. SOMNOLOGIE, 22(3), 175-182. doi:10.1007/s11818-018-0168-2
Pfaff, A., and Schlarb, A. (2018). Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns. SOMNOLOGIE 22, 175-182.
Pfaff, A., & Schlarb, A., 2018. Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns. SOMNOLOGIE, 22(3), p 175-182.
A. Pfaff and A. Schlarb, “Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns”, SOMNOLOGIE, vol. 22, 2018, pp. 175-182.
Pfaff, A., Schlarb, A.: Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns. SOMNOLOGIE. 22, 175-182 (2018).
Pfaff, Angela, and Schlarb, Angelika. “Does your childhood define how you sleep and love?: Sleep as apossible moderator of the relationship between child maltreatment and romantic relationship patterns”. SOMNOLOGIE 22.3 (2018): 175-182.