The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences

Seegelke C, Hughes C (2015)
Brain and Cognition 101: 12-16.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Abstract / Bemerkung
It has been proposed that the preparation of goal-direct actions involves internal movement simulation, or motor imagery. Evidence suggests that motor imagery is critically involved in the prediction of action consequences and contributes heavily to movement planning processes. The present study examined whether the sensitivity towards end-state comfort and the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. Participants performed a mental rotation task in which two images were simultaneously presented. The image on the left depicted the start posture of a right hand when grasping a bar, while the right image depicted the hand posture at the end of the action sequence. The right image displayed the bar in a vertical orientation with the hand in a comfortable (thumb-up) or in an uncomfortable (thumb-down) posture, while the bar in the left image was rotated in picture plane in steps of 450. Crucially, the two images formed either a physically possible or physically impossible to perform action sequence. Results revealed strikingly different response time patterns for the two action sequence conditions. In general, response times increased almost monotonically with increasing angular disparity for the possible to perform action sequences. However, slight deviations from this monotonicity were apparent when the sequences contained an uncomfortable as opposed to a comfortable final posture. In contrast, for the impossible sequences, response times did not follow a typical mental rotation function, but instead were uniformly very slow. These findings suggest that both biomechanical constraints (i.e., end-state comfort) and the awareness of the possibility/impossibility to perform an action sequence are considered during motor imagery. We conclude that motor representations contain information about the spatiotemporal movement organization and the possibility of performing an action, which are crucially involved in anticipation and planning of action sequences. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Stichworte
Motor planning
Erscheinungsjahr
2015
Zeitschriftentitel
Brain and Cognition
Band
101
Seite(n)
12-16
ISSN
0278-2626
eISSN
1090-2147
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2901255

Zitieren

Seegelke C, Hughes C. The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences. Brain and Cognition. 2015;101:12-16.
Seegelke, C., & Hughes, C. (2015). The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences. Brain and Cognition, 101, 12-16. doi:10.1016/j.bandc.2015.10.006
Seegelke, C., and Hughes, C. (2015). The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences. Brain and Cognition 101, 12-16.
Seegelke, C., & Hughes, C., 2015. The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences. Brain and Cognition, 101, p 12-16.
C. Seegelke and C. Hughes, “The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences”, Brain and Cognition, vol. 101, 2015, pp. 12-16.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C.: The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences. Brain and Cognition. 101, 12-16 (2015).
Seegelke, Christian, and Hughes, Charmayne. “The influence of action possibility and end-state comfort on motor imagery of manual action sequences”. Brain and Cognition 101 (2015): 12-16.

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