Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder

Jeung-Maarse H, Schmitgen MM, Schmitt R, Bertsch K, Herpertz SC (2023)
Neuropsychopharmacology .

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
Download
Es wurden keine Dateien hochgeladen. Nur Publikationsnachweis!
Autor*in
Jeung-Maarse, HaangUniBi; Schmitgen, Mike M; Schmitt, Ruth; Bertsch, Katja; Herpertz, Sabine C
Abstract / Bemerkung
The amygdala is a key region in current neurocircuitry models of reactive aggression as it is crucially involved in detecting social threat and provocation. An increased amygdala reactivity to angry faces has been reported in aggression-prone individuals and the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) could dampen anger-related amygdala reactivity in a number of mental disorders. One example is the antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) which has so far only been studied in limited numbers. To address the question whether OT can normalize amygdala hyperreactivity to emotional faces, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment with 20 men and 18 women with ASPD and 20 male and 20 female healthy control (HC) participants in a double-blind, randomized, placebo (PLC)-controlled within-subject design. Participants were exposed to an emotion classification task (fearful, angry, and happy faces) after receiving an intranasal dose (24IU) of synthetic OT or PLC. We found OT to attenuate right amygdala hyperactivity to angry faces in participants with ASPD to such an extent that the intensity of amygdala activity in the ASPD group in the OT condition decreased to the level of amygdala activity in the PLC condition in the HC group. There was also a trend that OT effects were generally larger in women than in men. These findings suggest that OT differentially modulates the amygdala following social threatening or provoking cues in dependence of psychopathology (ASPD vs. HC) and sex (male vs. female). Particularly female ASPD patients could benefit from OT in the treatment of reactive aggression. © 2023. The Author(s).
Erscheinungsjahr
2023
Zeitschriftentitel
Neuropsychopharmacology
eISSN
1740-634X
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2978075

Zitieren

Jeung-Maarse H, Schmitgen MM, Schmitt R, Bertsch K, Herpertz SC. Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology . 2023.
Jeung-Maarse, H., Schmitgen, M. M., Schmitt, R., Bertsch, K., & Herpertz, S. C. (2023). Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-023-01549-9
Jeung-Maarse, Haang, Schmitgen, Mike M, Schmitt, Ruth, Bertsch, Katja, and Herpertz, Sabine C. 2023. “Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder”. Neuropsychopharmacology .
Jeung-Maarse, H., Schmitgen, M. M., Schmitt, R., Bertsch, K., and Herpertz, S. C. (2023). Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology .
Jeung-Maarse, H., et al., 2023. Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology .
H. Jeung-Maarse, et al., “Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder”, Neuropsychopharmacology , 2023.
Jeung-Maarse, H., Schmitgen, M.M., Schmitt, R., Bertsch, K., Herpertz, S.C.: Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology . (2023).
Jeung-Maarse, Haang, Schmitgen, Mike M, Schmitt, Ruth, Bertsch, Katja, and Herpertz, Sabine C. “Oxytocin effects on amygdala reactivity to angry faces in males and females with antisocial personality disorder”. Neuropsychopharmacology (2023).
Export

Markieren/ Markierung löschen
Markierte Publikationen

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

Dieser Datensatz im Web of Science®
Quellen

PMID: 36941365
PubMed | Europe PMC

Suchen in

Google Scholar