Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study

Kostareva U, Albright CL, Berens E-M, Klinger J, Ivanov LL, Guttersrud O, Liu M, Sentell TL (2022)
Applied nursing research : ANR: 151598.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Kostareva, Uliana; Albright, Cheryl L; Berens, Eva-MariaUniBi; Klinger, Julia; Ivanov, Luba L; Guttersrud, Oystein; Liu, Min; Sentell, Tetine L
Abstract / Bemerkung
BACKGROUND: People with limited health literacy may have trouble finding, understanding, and using health-related information and services and navigating the healthcare system.; PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the health literacy of immigrants from the former Soviet Union (FSU) using the Health Literacy Survey (HLS19-Q12 in Russian) and explore associated socio-demographic factors.; METHOD: This mixed methods study recruited adult immigrants through social networks and social media and included data from online survey and follow-up interviews. Variance in health literacy was explained using multiple linear regression. Qualitative data were analyzed through modified Grounded Theory approach.; FINDINGS: Survey respondents (n=318) were primarily female college-educated FSU immigrants aged 20-74 from 14 of the 15 FSU countries and distributed across 33 US states. Forty percent scored at or below predefined cut-offs for inadequate or problematic health literacy levels. Social status, social support, and English proficiency were significant variables in explaining variance in health literacy scores while controlling for age, gender, and education. Interviews (n=24) identified eight themes: English proficiency, social support, health insurance, experience with health care, complexity of the US healthcare system, relevant health information, health beliefs/practices, and trust.; DISCUSSION: There is a need to distribute health-related information in the native language (e.g., Russian), potentially through social media and immigrants' social networks. Health providers should be aware of the prevalence of inadequate and problematic health literacy among FSU immigrants and consider associated social factors. Copyright © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Erscheinungsjahr
2022
Zeitschriftentitel
Applied nursing research : ANR
Art.-Nr.
151598
ISSN
1532-8201
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2963959

Zitieren

Kostareva U, Albright CL, Berens E-M, et al. Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study. Applied nursing research : ANR. 2022: 151598.
Kostareva, U., Albright, C. L., Berens, E. - M., Klinger, J., Ivanov, L. L., Guttersrud, O., Liu, M., et al. (2022). Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study. Applied nursing research : ANR, 151598. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnr.2022.151598
Kostareva, U., Albright, C. L., Berens, E. - M., Klinger, J., Ivanov, L. L., Guttersrud, O., Liu, M., and Sentell, T. L. (2022). Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study. Applied nursing research : ANR:151598.
Kostareva, U., et al., 2022. Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study. Applied nursing research : ANR, : 151598.
U. Kostareva, et al., “Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study”, Applied nursing research : ANR, 2022, : 151598.
Kostareva, U., Albright, C.L., Berens, E.-M., Klinger, J., Ivanov, L.L., Guttersrud, O., Liu, M., Sentell, T.L.: Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study. Applied nursing research : ANR. : 151598 (2022).
Kostareva, Uliana, Albright, Cheryl L, Berens, Eva-Maria, Klinger, Julia, Ivanov, Luba L, Guttersrud, Oystein, Liu, Min, and Sentell, Tetine L. “Health literacy in former Soviet Union immigrants in the US: A mixed methods study”. Applied nursing research : ANR (2022): 151598.

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