Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe?

Thevenod F, Schreiber T, Lee W-K (2022)
Archives of toxicology.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Thevenod, Frank; Schreiber, Timm; Lee, Wing-KeeUniBi
Abstract / Bemerkung
The kidney is the main organ that senses changes in systemic oxygen tension, but itis also the key detoxification, transit and excretion site of transition metals (TMs). Pivotal to oxygen sensing are prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), which hydroxylate specific residues in hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), key transcription factors that orchestrate responses to hypoxia, such as induction of erythropoietin (EPO). The essential TM ion Fe is a key component and regulator of the hypoxia-PHD-HIF-EPO (HPHE) signaling axis, which governs erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, anaerobic metabolism, adaptation, survival and proliferation, and hence cell and body homeostasis. However, inadequate concentrations of essential TMs or entry of non-essential TMs in organisms cause toxicity and disrupt health. Non-essential TMs are toxic because they enter cells and displace essential TMs by ionic and molecular mimicry, e. g. in metalloproteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HPHE interactions with TMs (Fe, Co, Ni, Cd, Cr, and Pt) as well as their implications in renal physiology, pathophysiology and toxicology. Some TMs, such as Fe and Co, may activate renal HPHE signaling, which may be beneficial under some circumstances, for example, bymitigating renal injuries from other causes, but may also promote pathologies, such as renal cancer development and metastasis. Yet some other TMs appear to disrupt renal HPHE signaling, contributing to the complex picture of TM (nephro-)toxicity. Strikingly, despite a wealth of literature on the topic, current knowledge lacks a deeper molecular understanding of TM interaction with HPHE signaling, in particular in the kidney. This precludes rationale preventive and therapeutic approaches to TM nephrotoxicity, although recently activators of HPHE signaling have become available for therapy. © 2022. The Author(s).
Erscheinungsjahr
2022
Zeitschriftentitel
Archives of toxicology
eISSN
1432-0738
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2962514

Zitieren

Thevenod F, Schreiber T, Lee W-K. Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe? Archives of toxicology. 2022.
Thevenod, F., Schreiber, T., & Lee, W. - K. (2022). Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe? Archives of toxicology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00204-022-03285-3
Thevenod, F., Schreiber, T., and Lee, W. - K. (2022). Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe? Archives of toxicology.
Thevenod, F., Schreiber, T., & Lee, W.-K., 2022. Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe? Archives of toxicology.
F. Thevenod, T. Schreiber, and W.-K. Lee, “Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe?”, Archives of toxicology, 2022.
Thevenod, F., Schreiber, T., Lee, W.-K.: Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe? Archives of toxicology. (2022).
Thevenod, Frank, Schreiber, Timm, and Lee, Wing-Kee. “Renal hypoxia-HIF-PHD-EPO signaling in transition metal nephrotoxicity: friend or foe?”. Archives of toxicology (2022).

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