The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes

Kikuchi DW, Barfield M, Herberstein ME, Mappes J, Holt RD (2022)
American Naturalist.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Kikuchi, David W.UniBi; Barfield, Michael; Herberstein, Marie E.; Mappes, Johanna; Holt, Robert D.
Abstract / Bemerkung
Understanding Batesian mimicry is a classic problem in evolutionary biology. In Batesian mimicry, a defended species (the model) is mimicked by an undefended species (the mimic). Prior theories have emphasized the role of predator behavior and learning as well as evolution in model-mimic complexes but have not examined the role of population dynamics in potentially governing the relative abundances and even persistence of model-mimic systems. Here, we examined the effect of the population dynamics of predators and alternative prey on the prevalence of warning-signaling prey composed of models and mimics. Using optimal foraging theory and signal detection theory, we found that the inclusion of predator and alternative prey population dynamics could reverse traditional theoretical predictions: as alternative prey increase in numbers, mimics suffer because larger populations of predators are maintained, resulting in apparent competition. Under some circumstances, apparent competition affects model populations as well, although not as severely as it affects mimics. Our results bear on the intriguing puzzle that in nature warning signals are relatively scarce, yet experiments suggest that such signals can be highly advantageous. The availability of alternative prey and numerical responses by predators can overwhelm advantages observed in experiments to keep warning signals in model-mimic systems relatively scarce.
Stichworte
warning signal; aposematism; apparent competition; signal detection; theory; community ecology; dynamics
Erscheinungsjahr
2022
Zeitschriftentitel
American Naturalist
ISSN
0003-0147
eISSN
1537-5323
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2961111

Zitieren

Kikuchi DW, Barfield M, Herberstein ME, Mappes J, Holt RD. The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes. American Naturalist. 2022.
Kikuchi, D. W., Barfield, M., Herberstein, M. E., Mappes, J., & Holt, R. D. (2022). The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes. American Naturalist. https://doi.org/10.1086/718162
Kikuchi, D. W., Barfield, M., Herberstein, M. E., Mappes, J., and Holt, R. D. (2022). The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes. American Naturalist.
Kikuchi, D.W., et al., 2022. The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes. American Naturalist.
D.W. Kikuchi, et al., “The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes”, American Naturalist, 2022.
Kikuchi, D.W., Barfield, M., Herberstein, M.E., Mappes, J., Holt, R.D.: The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes. American Naturalist. (2022).
Kikuchi, David W., Barfield, Michael, Herberstein, Marie E., Mappes, Johanna, and Holt, Robert D. “The Effect of Predator Population Dynamics on Batesian Mimicry Complexes”. American Naturalist (2022).

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