Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support

Dohle S, Schreiber M, Wingen T, Baumann M (2021)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology .

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Dohle, SimoneUniBi; Schreiber, Mike; Wingen, Tobias; Baumann, Marie
Abstract / Bemerkung
Some people believe that their own health is rather malleable and can be changed (incremental theory), whereas other people believe that their health is relatively fixed (entity theory). Previous research suggests that individuals who hold a strong incremental theory of health have more positive health-related attitudes and engage in more health-promoting behaviors in everyday life. However, less is known about the interpersonal effects of an incremental theory of health. A strong incremental theory of health could have detrimental consequences, such as increasing blame and reducing social support towards others who are ill. To test this, two studies (Study 1: N = 433, Study 2: N = 397) were conducted in which implicit theories of health (incremental vs. entity) were experimentally manipulated, and participants were presented with vignettes describing individuals suffering from different illnesses. The dependent variables included blame, sympathy, outcome expectancy, and social support. Study 1 demonstrated that an incremental theory of health increased blame towards people suffering from an illness, regardless of whether a physical or mental illness was presented, and blame indirectly attenuated social support. Study 2 showed that an incremental theory increased outcome expectancy, which indirectly amplified social support. In sum, this research suggests that an incremental theory of health may decrease social support via blame, but increases in outcome expectancy may counteract this effect.
Erscheinungsjahr
2021
Zeitschriftentitel
Journal of Applied Social Psychology
ISSN
0021-9029
eISSN
1559-1816
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2960203

Zitieren

Dohle S, Schreiber M, Wingen T, Baumann M. Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support. Journal of Applied Social Psychology . 2021.
Dohle, S., Schreiber, M., Wingen, T., & Baumann, M. (2021). Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support. Journal of Applied Social Psychology . https://doi.org/10.1111/jasp.12844
Dohle, S., Schreiber, M., Wingen, T., and Baumann, M. (2021). Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support. Journal of Applied Social Psychology .
Dohle, S., et al., 2021. Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support. Journal of Applied Social Psychology .
S. Dohle, et al., “Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support”, Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 2021.
Dohle, S., Schreiber, M., Wingen, T., Baumann, M.: Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support. Journal of Applied Social Psychology . (2021).
Dohle, Simone, Schreiber, Mike, Wingen, Tobias, and Baumann, Marie. “Blaming others for their illness: The influence of health-related implicit theories on blame and social support”. Journal of Applied Social Psychology (2021).

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