Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress

Krysenko S, Matthews A, Busche T, Bera A, Wohlleben W (2021)
Microbial physiology.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Krysenko, Sergii; Matthews, Arne; Busche, TobiasUniBi; Bera, Agnieszka; Wohlleben, Wolfgang
Abstract / Bemerkung
Soil bacteria from the genus Streptomyces, phylum Actinobacteria, feature a complex metabolism and diverse adaptations to environmental stress. These characteristics are consequences of variable nutrition availability in the soil and allow survival under changing nitrogen conditions. Streptomyces coelicolor is a model organism for Actinobacteria and is able to use nitrogen from a variety of sources including unusual compounds originating from the decomposition of dead plant and animal material, such as polyamines or monoamines (like ethanolamine). Assimilation of nitrogen from these sources in S. coelicolor remains largely unstudied. Using microbiological, biochemical and in silico approaches, it was recently possible to postulate polyamine and monoamine (ethanolamine) utilization pathways in S. coelicolor. Glutamine synthetase-like enzymes (GS-like) play a central role in these pathways. Extensive studies have revealed that these enzymes are able to detoxify polyamines or monoamines and allow the survival of S. coelicolor in soil containing an excess of these compounds. On the other hand, at low concentrations, polyamines and monoamines can be utilized as nitrogen and carbon sources. It has been demonstrated that the first step in poly-/monoamine assimilation is catalyzed by GlnA3 (a gamma-glutamylpolyamine synthetase) and GlnA4 (a gamma-glutamylethanolamide synthetase), respectively. First insights into the regulation of polyamine and ethanolamine metabolism have revealed that the expression of the glnA3 and the glnA4 gene are controlled on the transcriptional level. © 2021 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.
Erscheinungsjahr
2021
Zeitschriftentitel
Microbial physiology
eISSN
2673-1673
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2955234

Zitieren

Krysenko S, Matthews A, Busche T, Bera A, Wohlleben W. Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress. Microbial physiology. 2021.
Krysenko, S., Matthews, A., Busche, T., Bera, A., & Wohlleben, W. (2021). Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress. Microbial physiology. https://doi.org/10.1159/000516644
Krysenko, S., Matthews, A., Busche, T., Bera, A., and Wohlleben, W. (2021). Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress. Microbial physiology.
Krysenko, S., et al., 2021. Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress. Microbial physiology.
S. Krysenko, et al., “Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress”, Microbial physiology, 2021.
Krysenko, S., Matthews, A., Busche, T., Bera, A., Wohlleben, W.: Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress. Microbial physiology. (2021).
Krysenko, Sergii, Matthews, Arne, Busche, Tobias, Bera, Agnieszka, and Wohlleben, Wolfgang. “Poly- and Monoamine Metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor: The New Role of Glutamine Synthetase-Like Enzymes in the Survival under Environmental Stress”. Microbial physiology (2021).

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