The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict

Schonard C, Ulrich R, Janczyk M (2020)
Experimental Psychology: 1-15.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
Download
Es wurden keine Dateien hochgeladen. Nur Publikationsnachweis!
Autor*in
Schonard, CarolinUniBi ; Ulrich, Rolf; Janczyk, Markus
Abstract / Bemerkung
A common observation in dual tasking is a performance decrement in one or both tasks compared with single tasking. Besides, more specific interference occurs depending on certain characteristics of the two tasks. In particular, even Task 1 performance is often improved when responses in both tasks are compatible (e.g., both require left responses) compared to when they are incompatible: the compatibility-based backward crosstalk effect (BCE). Similar to what is observed for conflict tasks, the BCE is sequentially modulated: It is larger following compatible than following incompatible trials. Previous work has attributed this observation to adaptation effects triggered by response conflict arising during incompatible trials. In two experiments, we assessed sequential modulations following trials with different degrees of such a response conflict. In contrast to our expectations, a clear and sizeable sequential modulation was observed even under conditions where no BCE, and thus no empirical sign of an objective response conflict, was present in the previous trial. Therefore, our results show sequential modulations even without prior response conflict, which is not the (sole) trigger of sequential modulations accordingly. We discuss these results with regard to other potential triggers such as the subjective experience of conflict or difficulty, episodic retrieval, and repetitions of response combinations.
Stichworte
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology; Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous); General Psychology; General Medicine
Erscheinungsjahr
2020
Zeitschriftentitel
Experimental Psychology
Seite(n)
1-15
ISSN
1618-3169, 2190-5142
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2948741

Zitieren

Schonard C, Ulrich R, Janczyk M. The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict. Experimental Psychology. 2020:1-15.
Schonard, C., Ulrich, R., & Janczyk, M. (2020). The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict. Experimental Psychology, 1-15. doi:10.1027/1618-3169/a000498
Schonard, C., Ulrich, R., and Janczyk, M. (2020). The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict. Experimental Psychology, 1-15.
Schonard, C., Ulrich, R., & Janczyk, M., 2020. The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict. Experimental Psychology, , p 1-15.
C. Schonard, R. Ulrich, and M. Janczyk, “The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict”, Experimental Psychology, 2020, pp. 1-15.
Schonard, C., Ulrich, R., Janczyk, M.: The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict. Experimental Psychology. 1-15 (2020).
Schonard, Carolin, Ulrich, Rolf, and Janczyk, Markus. “The Backward Crosstalk Effect Does Not Depend on the Degree of a Preceding Response Conflict”. Experimental Psychology (2020): 1-15.

Export

Markieren/ Markierung löschen
Markierte Publikationen

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

Dieser Datensatz im Web of Science®

Quellen

PMID: 33167820
PubMed | Europe PMC

Suchen in

Google Scholar