Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations

Rebrina F, Petroczki K, Inhofer M, Reinhold K, Schmoll T (2020)
Evolutionary Ecology.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Rebrina, Fran; Petroczki, Krisztina; Inhofer, Marina; Reinhold, KlausUniBi; Schmoll, TimUniBi
Abstract / Bemerkung
Producing calls with increased minimum carrier frequency is well documented in sound communicating species confronted with noise pollution, possibly helping them to avoid acoustic masking of low-frequency signals. However, the lack of studies on invertebrates limits our understanding of the potentially adverse effects of anthropogenic noise on natural populations. While males of the grasshopperChorthippus biguttulusare known to produce courtship signals with elevated low-frequency local maxima (LFLM) in roadside populations, previous studies provided no insight into morphological traits underlying LFLM shifts. Although developmental plasticity was identified as one main factor accounting for elevated LFLM, an additional role for a more hard-wired trait architecture was proposed, possibly as a result of adaptation to traffic noise. Our current study therefore aims to assess (1) whether the position of LFLM is related to male body size, (2) whether body size is correlated with motorway age, and (3) whether the position of LFLM is correlated with motorway age inC. biguttulusmales from roadside populations. In addition to substantial variation in LFLM amongC. biguttulusmales, we found that larger males produced signals with lower LFLM, suggesting a potential role in female choice as a predictor of male quality. While we found no significant correlation between LFLM and motorway age,C. biguttulusmales were larger near older motorway sections. This positive correlation may be due to several reasons, including: (1) higher nutrient concentration and availability in plant tissues due to eutrophication of roadside habitats; (2) temporal succession of male size phenotypes during colonization processes; and/or (3) selection for larger body size in roadside populations. Our results highlight the multifaceted and often complex nature of the relationships between morphology, signal traits and anthropogenic pressures on sound communication in invertebrates.
Stichworte
Acoustic communication; Anthropogenic change; Chorthippus biguttulus; Motorway age; Road noise; Structural body size
Erscheinungsjahr
2020
Zeitschriftentitel
Evolutionary Ecology
ISSN
0269-7653
eISSN
1573-8477
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2946110

Zitieren

Rebrina F, Petroczki K, Inhofer M, Reinhold K, Schmoll T. Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations. Evolutionary Ecology. 2020.
Rebrina, F., Petroczki, K., Inhofer, M., Reinhold, K., & Schmoll, T. (2020). Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations. Evolutionary Ecology. doi:10.1007/s10682-020-10077-7
Rebrina, F., Petroczki, K., Inhofer, M., Reinhold, K., and Schmoll, T. (2020). Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations. Evolutionary Ecology.
Rebrina, F., et al., 2020. Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations. Evolutionary Ecology.
F. Rebrina, et al., “Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations”, Evolutionary Ecology, 2020.
Rebrina, F., Petroczki, K., Inhofer, M., Reinhold, K., Schmoll, T.: Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations. Evolutionary Ecology. (2020).
Rebrina, Fran, Petroczki, Krisztina, Inhofer, Marina, Reinhold, Klaus, and Schmoll, Tim. “Motorway age is linked to larger body size, but not song carrier frequency, in male grasshoppers from roadside populations”. Evolutionary Ecology (2020).

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