Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation

Marten O, Mulhern B, Bansback N, Tsuchiya A (2020)
Medical Decision Making 40(6): 735-745.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Marten, OleUniBi ; Mulhern, Brendan; Bansback, Nick; Tsuchiya, Aki
Abstract / Bemerkung
The EQ-5D is made up of health state dimensions and levels, in which some combinations seem less “plausible” than others. If “implausible” states are used in health state valuation exercises, then respondents may have difficulty imagining them, causing measurement error. There is currently no standard solution: some valuation studies exclude such states, whereas others leave them in. This study aims to address 2 gaps in the literature: 1) to propose an evidence-based set of the least prevalent two-way combinations of EQ-5D-5L dimension levels and 2) to quantify the impact of removing perceived implausible states from valuation designs. For the first aim, we use data from 2 waves of the English General Practitioner Patient Survey ( n = 1,639,453). For the second aim, we remodel a secondary data set of a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) with duration that valued EQ-5D-5L and compare across models that drop observations involving different health states: 1) implausible states as defined in the literature, 2) the least prevalent states identified in stage 1, and 3) randomly select states, alongside 4) a model that does not drop any observations. The results indicate that two-way combinations previously thought to be implausible actually exist among the general population; there are other combinations that are rarer, and removing implausible states from an experimental design of a DCE with duration leads to value sets with potentially different characteristics depending on the criterion of implausible states. We advise against the routine removal of implausible states from health state valuation studies.
Stichworte
DCEtto choice design; difficult-to-imagine health states; EQ-5D-5L; General Practitioner Patient Survey; self-reported health
Erscheinungsjahr
2020
Zeitschriftentitel
Medical Decision Making
Band
40
Ausgabe
6
Seite(n)
735-745
ISSN
0272-989X
eISSN
1552-681X
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2944850

Zitieren

Marten O, Mulhern B, Bansback N, Tsuchiya A. Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation. Medical Decision Making. 2020;40(6):735-745.
Marten, O., Mulhern, B., Bansback, N., & Tsuchiya, A. (2020). Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation. Medical Decision Making, 40(6), 735-745. doi:10.1177/0272989x20940673
Marten, O., Mulhern, B., Bansback, N., and Tsuchiya, A. (2020). Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation. Medical Decision Making 40, 735-745.
Marten, O., et al., 2020. Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation. Medical Decision Making, 40(6), p 735-745.
O. Marten, et al., “Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation”, Medical Decision Making, vol. 40, 2020, pp. 735-745.
Marten, O., Mulhern, B., Bansback, N., Tsuchiya, A.: Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation. Medical Decision Making. 40, 735-745 (2020).
Marten, Ole, Mulhern, Brendan, Bansback, Nick, and Tsuchiya, Aki. “Implausible States: Prevalence of EQ-5D-5L States in the General Population and Its Effect on Health State Valuation”. Medical Decision Making 40.6 (2020): 735-745.
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