Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae

Friedrichs J, Schweiger R, Geisler S, Mix A, Wittstock U, Müller C (2020)
Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 124: 103431.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Abstract / Bemerkung
Plants of the Brassicales are defended by a binary system, in which glucosinolates are degraded by myrosinases, forming toxic breakdown products such as isothiocyanates and nitriles. Various detoxification pathways and avoidance strategies have been found that allow different herbivorous insect taxa to deal with the glucosinolate-myrosinase system of their host plants. Here, we investigated how larvae of the leaf beetle species Phaedon cochleariae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a feeding specialist on Brassicaceae, cope with this binary defence. We performed feeding experiments using leaves of watercress (Nasturtium officinale, containing 2-phenylethyl glucosinolate as major glucosinolate and myrosinases) and pea (Pisum sativum, lacking glucosinolates and myrosinases), to which benzenic glucosinolates (benzyl- or 4-hydroxybenzyl glucosinolate) were applied. Performing comparative metabolomics using UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS, N-(phenylacetyl) aspartic acid, N-(benzoyl) aspartic acid and N-(4-hydroxybenzoyl) aspartic acid were identified as major metabolites of 2-phenylethyl-, benzyl- and 4-hydroxybenzyl glucosinolate, respectively, in larvae and faeces. This suggests that larvae of P. cochleariae metabolise isothiocyanates or nitriles to aspartic acid conjugates of aromatic acids derived from the ingested benzenic glucosinolates. Myrosinase measurements revealed activity only in second-instar larvae that were fed with watercress, but not in freshly moulted and starved second-instar larvae fed with pea leaves. Our results indicate that the predicted pathway can occur independently of the presence of plant myrosinases, because the same major glucosinolate-breakdown metabolites were found in the larvae feeding on treated watercress and pea leaves. A conjugation of glucosinolate-derived compounds with aspartic acid is a novel metabolic pathway that has not been described for other herbivores.
Stichworte
Insect Science; Biochemistry; Molecular Biology
Erscheinungsjahr
2020
Zeitschriftentitel
Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Band
124
Art.-Nr.
103431
ISSN
0965-1748
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2944612

Zitieren

Friedrichs J, Schweiger R, Geisler S, Mix A, Wittstock U, Müller C. Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 2020;124: 103431.
Friedrichs, J., Schweiger, R., Geisler, S., Mix, A., Wittstock, U., & Müller, C. (2020). Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 124, 103431. doi:10.1016/j.ibmb.2020.103431
Friedrichs, J., Schweiger, R., Geisler, S., Mix, A., Wittstock, U., and Müller, C. (2020). Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 124:103431.
Friedrichs, J., et al., 2020. Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 124: 103431.
J. Friedrichs, et al., “Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae”, Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, vol. 124, 2020, : 103431.
Friedrichs, J., Schweiger, R., Geisler, S., Mix, A., Wittstock, U., Müller, C.: Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 124, : 103431 (2020).
Friedrichs, Jeanne, Schweiger, Rabea, Geisler, Svenja, Mix, Andreas, Wittstock, Ute, and Müller, Caroline. “Novel glucosinolate metabolism in larvae of the leaf beetle Phaedon cochleariae”. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 124 (2020): 103431.

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PMID: 32653632
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