Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task

Schütz C, Schack T (2019)
Experimental brain research.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | E-Veröff. vor dem Druck| Englisch
 
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Abstract / Bemerkung
In sequential, repetitive tasks, we often partially reuse former motor plans. This causes a persistence of an earlier adopted posture (termed motor hysteresis). The cost-optimization hypothesis states that a partial reuse reduces the cognitive cost of a movement, while the persistence in a former posture increases its mechanical cost. An optimal fraction of reuse, which depends on the relative cognitive and mechanical cost, minimizes the total movement cost. Several studies postulate differences in mechanical or cognitive cost as a result of hemispheric lateralization. In the current study, we asked whether these differences would result in different fractions of motor plan reuse. To this end, left- and right-handed dominant participants executed a sequential motor task (opening a column of drawers) with their dominant and non-dominant hand. The size of the motor hysteresis effect was measured as a proxy for the fraction of plan reuse. Participants used similar postures and exhibited a similar hysteresis effect, irrespective of hand and handedness. This finding indicates that either the cognitive and mechanical costs of a motor task are unaffected by hemispheric differences or that their effect on motor planning is negligible.
Erscheinungsjahr
2019
Zeitschriftentitel
Experimental brain research
eISSN
1432-1106
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2937745

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Schütz C, Schack T. Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task. Experimental brain research. 2019.
Schütz, C., & Schack, T. (2019). Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task. Experimental brain research. doi:10.1007/s00221-019-05652-6
Schütz, C., and Schack, T. (2019). Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task. Experimental brain research.
Schütz, C., & Schack, T., 2019. Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task. Experimental brain research.
C. Schütz and T. Schack, “Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task”, Experimental brain research, 2019.
Schütz, C., Schack, T.: Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task. Experimental brain research. (2019).
Schütz, Christoph, and Schack, Thomas. “Hemispheric lateralization does not affect the cognitive and mechanical cost of a sequential motor task”. Experimental brain research (2019).

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