Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli

Iffland B, Wiggert N, Neuner F, Blechert J (2018)
BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 139: 152-162.

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Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
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Abstract / Bemerkung
Physiological stress responses vary as a function of adverse childhood experiences. However, previous studies concentrate on familial sources of childhood adversity. Potential long-term effects of peer victimization on physiology and affective responses are less known. This study examined cardiac, facial-muscular, and experiential responses to social evaluative stimuli in ninety-four healthy subjects with various degrees of experienced peer victimization. In a social conditioning task, peer victimization was associated with similarly attenuated cardiac and facial-muscular responses to negative and neutral stimuli, while differentiated physiological responses to negative and neutral stimuli were found in subjects without peer victimization. Overall, increased ratings of arousal, valence and disapproval for negative compared to neutral stimuli were found. Contrary to the physiological response, peer victimization was associated with more negative ratings of negative stimuli one month after acquisition. The results suggest that the physiological and experiential reactivity towards both negative and neutral social stimuli is affected by the experience of peer victimization. Peer victimization causes generalized autonomic dysregulation and memory recall biases during social learning impeding adequate response preparation to social stressors.
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Zeitschriftentitel
BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Band
139
Seite(n)
152-162
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Iffland B, Wiggert N, Neuner F, Blechert J. Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2018;139:152-162.
Iffland, B., Wiggert, N., Neuner, F., & Blechert, J. (2018). Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 139, 152-162. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.005
Iffland, B., Wiggert, N., Neuner, F., and Blechert, J. (2018). Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 139, 152-162.
Iffland, B., et al., 2018. Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 139, p 152-162.
B. Iffland, et al., “Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli”, BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 139, 2018, pp. 152-162.
Iffland, B., Wiggert, N., Neuner, F., Blechert, J.: Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 139, 152-162 (2018).
Iffland, Benjamin, Wiggert, Nicole, Neuner, Frank, and Blechert, Jens. “Neutral is negative enough-Peer victimization influences cardiac, facial-muscular and experiential reactions to both negative evaluative and neutral social stimuli”. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 139 (2018): 152-162.

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Attentional avoidance in peer victimized individuals with and without psychiatric disorders.
Iffland B, Weitkämper A, Weitkämper NJ, Neuner F., BMC Psychol 7(1), 2019
PMID: 30795803

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