Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II

Eibich P, Buchmann N, Kroh M, Wagner GG, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Demuth I, Norman K (2016)
The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 71(4): 515-520.

Download
Es wurde kein Volltext hochgeladen. Nur Publikationsnachweis!
Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
Autor
; ; ; ; ; ;
Abstract / Bemerkung
Background. Excessive loss of muscle mass in advanced age is a major risk factor for decreased physical ability and falls. Physical activity and exercise training are typically recommended to maintain muscle mass and prevent weakness. How exercise in different stages of life relates to muscle mass, grip strength, and risk for weakness in later life is not well understood.Methods. Baseline data on 891 participants at least 60 years old from the Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II) were analyzed. Linear and logistic regressions of self-reported exercise in early adulthood, old age, or both on appendicular lean mass (ALM), grip strength, and a risk indicator for weakness (ALM/ body mass index cutoff) were calculated. In addition, treatment bounds are analyzed to address potential confounding using a method proposed by Oster.Results. Analyses indicate that for men only, continuous exercise is significantly associated with higher muscle mass (SD = 0.24, p < .001), grip strength (SD = 0.18, p < .05), and lower risk for clinically relevant low muscle mass (odds ratio = 0.36, p < .01). Exercise in early adulthood alone is not significantly associated with muscle mass or strength. No significant associations were observed for women.Conclusions. The results of the current study underscore the importance of health programs to promote physical activity with a focus on young adults, a group known to be affected from environmentally associated decline of physical activity, and to promote the continuation of physical exercise from early adulthood into later life in general.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Band
71
Ausgabe
4
Seite(n)
515-520
PUB-ID

Zitieren

Eibich P, Buchmann N, Kroh M, et al. Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2016;71(4):515-520.
Eibich, P., Buchmann, N., Kroh, M., Wagner, G. G., Steinhagen-Thiessen, E., Demuth, I., & Norman, K. (2016). Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 71(4), 515-520. doi:10.1093/gerona/glv171
Eibich, P., Buchmann, N., Kroh, M., Wagner, G. G., Steinhagen-Thiessen, E., Demuth, I., and Norman, K. (2016). Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 71, 515-520.
Eibich, P., et al., 2016. Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 71(4), p 515-520.
P. Eibich, et al., “Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II”, The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, vol. 71, 2016, pp. 515-520.
Eibich, P., Buchmann, N., Kroh, M., Wagner, G.G., Steinhagen-Thiessen, E., Demuth, I., Norman, K.: Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 71, 515-520 (2016).
Eibich, Peter, Buchmann, Nikolaus, Kroh, Martin, Wagner, Gert G., Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth, Demuth, Ilja, and Norman, Kristina. “Exercise at Different Ages and Appendicular Lean Mass and Strength in Later Life: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II”. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 71.4 (2016): 515-520.

7 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Association between sarcopenia and nutritional status and physical activity among community-dwelling Chinese adults aged 60 years and older.
Hai S, Cao L, Wang H, Zhou J, Liu P, Yang Y, Hao Q, Dong B., Geriatr Gerontol Int 17(11), 2017
PMID: 28188973
Association of Multiorgan Computed Tomographic Phenomap With Adverse Cardiovascular Health Outcomes: The Framingham Heart Study.
Shah RV, Yeri AS, Murthy VL, Massaro JM, D'Agostino R, Freedman JE, Long MT, Fox CS, Das S, Benjamin EJ, Vasan RS, O'Donnell CJ, Hoffmann U., JAMA Cardiol 2(11), 2017
PMID: 28975197
Polypharmacy as a Risk Factor for Clinically Relevant Sarcopenia: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.
König M, Spira D, Demuth I, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Norman K., J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 73(1), 2017
PMID: 28481965
Adherence to a Mediterranean-Style Diet and Appendicular Lean Mass in Community-Dwelling Older People: Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.
Nikolov J, Spira D, Aleksandrova K, Otten L, Meyer A, Demuth I, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Eckardt R, Norman K., J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 71(10), 2016
PMID: 26686229
Neuromuscular junction degeneration in muscle wasting.
Rudolf R, Deschenes MR, Sandri M., Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 19(3), 2016
PMID: 26870889

37 References

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.


AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
From sarcopenia to frailty: a road less traveled.
Morley JE, von Haehling S, Anker SD, Vellas B., J Cachexia Sarcopenia Muscle 5(1), 2014
PMID: 24526568
Epidemiology of sarcopenia among the elderly in New Mexico.
Baumgartner RN, Koehler KM, Gallagher D, Romero L, Heymsfield SB, Ross RR, Garry PJ, Lindeman RD., Am. J. Epidemiol. 147(8), 1998
PMID: 9554417
Age-associated changes in skeletal muscles and their effect on mobility: an operational diagnosis of sarcopenia.
Lauretani F, Russo CR, Bandinelli S, Bartali B, Cavazzini C, Di Iorio A, Corsi AM, Rantanen T, Guralnik JM, Ferrucci L., J. Appl. Physiol. 95(5), 2003
PMID: 14555665
The developmental origins of sarcopenia.
Sayer AA, Syddall H, Martin H, Patel H, Baylis D, Cooper C., J Nutr Health Aging 12(7), 2008
PMID: 18615224
Aging and sarcopenia.
Thompson DD., J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact 7(4), 2007
PMID: 18094505
Exercise comes of age: rationale and recommendations for a geriatric exercise prescription.
Singh MA., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 57(5), 2002
PMID: 11983720

Cawthon, 2013
Cohort profile: The Berlin Aging Study II (BASE-II).
Bertram L, Bockenhoff A, Demuth I, Duzel S, Eckardt R, Li SC, Lindenberger U, Pawelec G, Siedler T, Wagner GG, Steinhagen-Thiessen E., Int J Epidemiol 43(3), 2013
PMID: 23505255
Grip strength cutpoints for the identification of clinically relevant weakness.
Alley DE, Shardell MD, Peters KW, McLean RR, Dam TT, Kenny AM, Fragala MS, Harris TB, Kiel DP, Guralnik JM, Ferrucci L, Kritchevsky SB, Studenski SA, Vassileva MT, Cawthon PM., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 69(5), 2014
PMID: 24737558

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Elderly men and women benefit equally from prolonged resistance-type exercise training.
Leenders M, Verdijk LB, van der Hoeven L, van Kranenburg J, Nilwik R, van Loon LJ., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 68(7), 2012
PMID: 23223011
High-intensity strength training in nonagenarians. Effects on skeletal muscle.
Fiatarone MA, Marks EC, Ryan ND, Meredith CN, Lipsitz LA, Evans WJ., JAMA 263(22), 1990
PMID: 2342214
Exercise, aging, and muscle protein metabolism.
Yarasheski KE., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 58(10), 2003
PMID: 14570859
Strength conditioning in older men: skeletal muscle hypertrophy and improved function.
Frontera WR, Meredith CN, O'Reilly KP, Knuttgen HG, Evans WJ., J. Appl. Physiol. 64(3), 1988
PMID: 3366726
The benefits of strength training for older adults.
Seguin R, Nelson ME., Am J Prev Med 25(3 Suppl 2), 2003
PMID: 14552938
Systematic review of progressive resistance strength training in older adults.
Latham NK, Bennett DA, Stretton CM, Anderson CS., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 59(1), 2004
PMID: 14718486
The effects of aging and training on skeletal muscle.
Kirkendall DT, Garrett WE Jr., Am J Sports Med 26(4), 1998
PMID: 9689386
Effects of exercise programs on falls and mobility in frail and pre-frail older adults: A multicenter randomized controlled trial.
Faber MJ, Bosscher RJ, Chin A Paw MJ, van Wieringen PC., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 87(7), 2006
PMID: 16813773
A program to prevent functional decline in physically frail, elderly persons who live at home.
Gill TM, Baker DI, Gottschalk M, Peduzzi PN, Allore H, Byers A., N. Engl. J. Med. 347(14), 2002
PMID: 12362007
Effects of resistance training on older adults.
Hunter GR, McCarthy JP, Bamman MM., Sports Med 34(5), 2004
PMID: 15107011
Strength training for the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia.
Roth SM, Ferrell RF, Hurley BF., J Nutr Health Aging 4(3), 2000
PMID: 10936901
The decline in skeletal muscle mass with aging is mainly attributed to a reduction in type II muscle fiber size.
Nilwik R, Snijders T, Leenders M, Groen BB, van Kranenburg J, Verdijk LB, van Loon LJ., Exp. Gerontol. 48(5), 2013
PMID: 23425621
Exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis begins before the increase in muscle PGC-1alpha expression.
Wright DC, Han DH, Garcia-Roves PM, Geiger PC, Jones TE, Holloszy JO., J. Biol. Chem. 282(1), 2006
PMID: 17099248
The recommended dietary allowance for protein may not be adequate for older people to maintain skeletal muscle.
Campbell WW, Trappe TA, Wolfe RR, Evans WJ., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 56(6), 2001
PMID: 11382798

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Impact of nutrition on muscle mass, strength, and performance in older adults.
Mithal A, Bonjour JP, Boonen S, Burckhardt P, Degens H, El Hajj Fuleihan G, Josse R, Lips P, Morales Torres J, Rizzoli R, Yoshimura N, Wahl DA, Cooper C, Dawson-Hughes B; IOF CSA Nutrition Working Group., Osteoporos Int 24(5), 2012
PMID: 23247327
Resistance training alters the response of fed state mixed muscle protein synthesis in young men.
Tang JE, Perco JG, Moore DR, Wilkinson SB, Phillips SM., Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol. 294(1), 2007
PMID: 18032468

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Increases in muscle strength and balance using a resistance training program administered via a telecommunications system in older adults.
Sparrow D, Gottlieb DJ, Demolles D, Fielding RA., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 66(11), 2011
PMID: 21852283
Strength and function response to clinical interventions of older women categorized by weakness and low lean mass using classifications from the Foundation for the National Institute of Health sarcopenia project.
Fragala MS, Dam TT, Barber V, Judge JO, Studenski SA, Cawthon PM, McLean RR, Harris TB, Ferrucci L, Guralnik JM, Kiel DP, Kritchevsky SB, Shardell MD, Vassileva MT, Kenny AM., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 70(2), 2014
PMID: 25135999
Comparative effects of light or heavy resistance power training for improving lower extremity power and physical performance in mobility-limited older adults.
Reid KF, Martin KI, Doros G, Clark DJ, Hau C, Patten C, Phillips EM, Frontera WR, Fielding RA., J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 70(3), 2014
PMID: 25199912
Epidemiology of physical activity from adolescence to young adulthood.
Aaron DJ, Jekal YS, LaPorte RE., World Rev Nutr Diet 94(), 2005
PMID: 16145248

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
A birth of inactivity? A review of physical activity and parenthood.
Bellows-Riecken KH, Rhodes RE., Prev Med 46(2), 2007
PMID: 17919713

Export

Markieren/ Markierung löschen
Markierte Publikationen

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

Dieser Datensatz im Web of Science®

Quellen

PMID: 26442900
PubMed | Europe PMC

Suchen in

Google Scholar