Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou

Chen X-C, Jahn HJ, Engling G, Ward TJ, Krämer A, Ho K-F, Chan C-Y (2017)
SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT 580: 347-357.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Chen, Xiao-Cui; Jahn, Heiko J.UniBi; Engling, Guenter; Ward, Tony J.; Krämer, AlexanderUniBi ; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chan, Chuen-Yu
Abstract / Bemerkung
Total personal exposures can differ from the concentrations measured at stationary ambient monitoring sites. To provide further insight into factors affecting exposure to particles, chemical tracers were used to separate total personal exposure into its ambient and non-ambient components. Simultaneous measurements of ambient and personal exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted in eight districts of Guangzhou, a megacity in South China, during the winter of 2011. Considerable significant correlations (Spearman's Rho, r(s)) between personal exposures and ambient concentrations of sulfate (SO42-; r(s)> 0.68) were found in contrast to elemental carbon (EC; r(s) > 037). The average fraction of personal SW to ambient SO42- resulting in an adjusted ambient exposure factor of cc = 0.72 and a slope of 0.73 was determined from linear regression analysis when there were minimal indoor sources of SO42-. From all data pooled across the districts, the estimated average ambient -generated and non-ambient -generated exposure to PM2.5 were 55.3 mu g/m(3) (SD = 23.4 mu g/m(3)) and 18.1 mu g/m(3) (SD = 29.1 mu g/m(3)), respectively. A significant association was found between ambient -generated exposure and ambient PM2.5 concentrations (Pearson's r = 0.51, p < 0.001). As expected, the non-ambient generated exposure was not related to the ambient concentrations. This study highlights the importance of both ambient and non-ambient components of total personal exposure in the megacity of Guangzhou. Our results support the use of SO42- as a tracer of personal exposure to PM2.5 of ambient origin in environmental and epidemiological studies. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Stichworte
Environmental monitoring; Personal exposure; Fine aerosol particles; (PM2.5); SO42-; EC
Erscheinungsjahr
2017
Zeitschriftentitel
SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT
Band
580
Seite(n)
347-357
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2910345

Zitieren

Chen X-C, Jahn HJ, Engling G, et al. Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. 2017;580:347-357.
Chen, X. - C., Jahn, H. J., Engling, G., Ward, T. J., Krämer, A., Ho, K. - F., & Chan, C. - Y. (2017). Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 580, 347-357. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.10.241
Chen, X. - C., Jahn, H. J., Engling, G., Ward, T. J., Krämer, A., Ho, K. - F., and Chan, C. - Y. (2017). Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT 580, 347-357.
Chen, X.-C., et al., 2017. Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 580, p 347-357.
X.-C. Chen, et al., “Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou”, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, vol. 580, 2017, pp. 347-357.
Chen, X.-C., Jahn, H.J., Engling, G., Ward, T.J., Krämer, A., Ho, K.-F., Chan, C.-Y.: Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. 580, 347-357 (2017).
Chen, Xiao-Cui, Jahn, Heiko J., Engling, Guenter, Ward, Tony J., Krämer, Alexander, Ho, Kin-Fai, and Chan, Chuen-Yu. “Characterization of ambient-generated exposure to fine particles using sulfate as a tracer in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou”. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT 580 (2017): 347-357.

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