Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task

Schütz C, Weigelt M, Schack T (2016)
Experimental Brain Research 234(7): 2035-2043.

Download
Es wurde kein Volltext hochgeladen. Nur Publikationsnachweis!
Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
Autor
Abstract / Bemerkung
Neurophysiologic studies have shown differences in brain activation between pointing and grasping movements. We asked whether these two movement types would differ in their cognitive costs of motor planning. To this end, we designed a sequential, continuous posture selection task, suitable to investigate pointing and grasping movements to identical target locations. Participants had to open a column of drawers or point to a column of targets in ascending and descending progression. The global hand pro/supination at the moment of drawer/target contact was measured. The size of the motor hysteresis effect, i.e., the persistence to a former posture, was used as a proxy for the cognitive cost of motor planning. A larger hysteresis effect equals higher cognitive cost. Both motor tasks had similar costs of motor planning, but a larger range of motion was found for the grasping movements.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
Experimental Brain Research
Band
234
Ausgabe
7
Seite(n)
2035-2043
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Zitieren

Schütz C, Weigelt M, Schack T. Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task. Experimental Brain Research. 2016;234(7):2035-2043.
Schütz, C., Weigelt, M., & Schack, T. (2016). Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task. Experimental Brain Research, 234(7), 2035-2043. doi:10.1007/s00221-016-4608-6
Schütz, C., Weigelt, M., and Schack, T. (2016). Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task. Experimental Brain Research 234, 2035-2043.
Schütz, C., Weigelt, M., & Schack, T., 2016. Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task. Experimental Brain Research, 234(7), p 2035-2043.
C. Schütz, M. Weigelt, and T. Schack, “Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task”, Experimental Brain Research, vol. 234, 2016, pp. 2035-2043.
Schütz, C., Weigelt, M., Schack, T.: Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task. Experimental Brain Research. 234, 2035-2043 (2016).
Schütz, Christoph, Weigelt, Matthias, and Schack, Thomas. “Cognitive costs of motor planning do not differ between pointing and grasping in a sequential task”. Experimental Brain Research 234.7 (2016): 2035-2043.

2 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Motor hysteresis in a sequential grasping and pointing task is absent in task-critical joints.
Schütz C, Weigelt M, Schack T., Exp Brain Res 235(3), 2017
PMID: 27864596

28 References

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Kinematic features of unrestrained vertical arm movements.
Atkeson CG, Hollerbach JM., J. Neurosci. 5(9), 1985
PMID: 4031998

NA, 1967
Inter-joint coupling and joint angle synergies of human catching movements.
Bockemuhl T, Troje NF, Durr V., Hum Mov Sci 29(1), 2009
PMID: 19945187
Visual pathways for object-oriented action and object recognition: functional anatomy with PET.
Faillenot I, Toni I, Decety J, Gregoire MC, Jeannerod M., Cereb. Cortex 7(1), 1997
PMID: 9023435
Signal-dependent noise determines motor planning.
Harris CM, Wolpert DM., Nature 394(6695), 1998
PMID: 9723616
An organizing principle for a class of voluntary movements.
Hogan N., J. Neurosci. 4(11), 1984
PMID: 6502203
Computational motor control and human factors: modeling movements in real and possible environments.
Jax SA, Rosenbaum DA, Vaughan J, Meulenbroek RG., Hum Factors 45(1), 2003
PMID: 12916579

MI, 1999

JAS, Hum Mov Sci 13(), 1994

ML, Hum Mov Sci 14(), 1995

M, ACM Trans Model Comput Simul 8(), 1998
Changes in rCBF during grasping in humans examined by PET.
Matsumura M, Kawashima R, Naito E, Satoh K, Takahashi T, Yanagisawa T, Fukuda H., Neuroreport 7(3), 1996
PMID: 8733737

ID, 1991
The assessment and analysis of handedness: the Edinburgh inventory.
Oldfield RC., Neuropsychologia 9(1), 1971
PMID: 5146491

DA, Hum Mov Sci 11(), 1992
Knowledge Model for Selecting and Producing Reaching Movements.
Rosenbaum DA, Engelbrecht SE, Bushe MM, Loukopoulos LD., J Mot Behav 25(3), 1993
PMID: 12581991
Posture-based motion planning: applications to grasping.
Rosenbaum DA, Meulenbroek RJ, Vaughan J, Jansen C., Psychol Rev 108(4), 2001
PMID: 11699114
The problem of serial order in behavior: Lashley's legacy.
Rosenbaum DA, Cohen RG, Jax SA, Weiss DJ, van der Wel R., Hum Mov Sci 26(4), 2007
PMID: 17698232
Cognition, action, and object manipulation.
Rosenbaum DA, Chapman KM, Weigelt M, Weiss DJ, van der Wel R., Psychol Bull 138(5), 2012
PMID: 22448912
Influence of mechanical load on sequential effects.
Schutz C, Schack T., Exp Brain Res 228(4), 2013
PMID: 23727830
Motor primitives of pointing movements in a three-dimensional workspace.
Schutz C, Schack T., Exp Brain Res 227(3), 2013
PMID: 23604576
Prospective and retrospective effects in a virtual pointing task.
Schutz C, Schack T., Acta Psychol (Amst) 142(3), 2013
PMID: 23419809
Motor control strategies in a continuous task space.
Schutz C, Weigelt M, Odekerken D, Klein-Soetebier T, Schack T., Motor Control 15(3), 2011
PMID: 21878687
Representation of grasp postures and anticipatory motor planning in children.
Stockel T, Hughes CM, Schack T., Psychol Res 76(6), 2011
PMID: 22075763
The development of end-state comfort planning in preschool children.
Weigelt M, Schack T., Exp Psychol 57(6), 2010
PMID: 20371425
Moving and memorizing: motor planning modulates the recency effect in serial and free recall.
Weigelt M, Rosenbaum DA, Huelshorst S, Schack T., Acta Psychol (Amst) 132(1), 2009
PMID: 19591968

Export

Markieren/ Markierung löschen
Markierte Publikationen

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

Dieser Datensatz im Web of Science®

Quellen

PMID: 26965437
PubMed | Europe PMC

Suchen in

Google Scholar