Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

Wegener G, Krukenberg V, Riedel D, Tegetmeyer H, Boetius A (2015)
Nature 526(7574): 587-590.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Abstract / Bemerkung
The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia.
Erscheinungsjahr
2015
Zeitschriftentitel
Nature
Band
526
Ausgabe
7574
Seite(n)
587-590
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2783047

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Wegener G, Krukenberg V, Riedel D, Tegetmeyer H, Boetius A. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria. Nature. 2015;526(7574):587-590.
Wegener, G., Krukenberg, V., Riedel, D., Tegetmeyer, H., & Boetius, A. (2015). Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria. Nature, 526(7574), 587-590. doi:10.1038/nature15733
Wegener, G., Krukenberg, V., Riedel, D., Tegetmeyer, H., and Boetius, A. (2015). Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria. Nature 526, 587-590.
Wegener, G., et al., 2015. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria. Nature, 526(7574), p 587-590.
G. Wegener, et al., “Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.”, Nature, vol. 526, 2015, pp. 587-590.
Wegener, G., Krukenberg, V., Riedel, D., Tegetmeyer, H., Boetius, A.: Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria. Nature. 526, 587-590 (2015).
Wegener, Gunter, Krukenberg, Viola, Riedel, Dietmar, Tegetmeyer, Halina, and Boetius, Antje. “Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.”. Nature 526.7574 (2015): 587-590.
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