Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use

Gommans R, Stevens GWJM, Finne E, Cillessen AHN, Boniel-Nissim M, ter Bogt TFM (2015)
International Journal of Public Health 60(2): 167-177.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Autor*in
Gommans, Rob; Stevens, Gonneke W. J. M.; Finne, EmilyUniBi ; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Boniel-Nissim, Meyran; ter Bogt, Tom F. M.
Abstract / Bemerkung
Objectives This study investigated the unique associations between electronic media communication (EMC) with friends and adolescent substance use (tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis), over and beyond the associations of face-to-face (FTF) interactions with friends and the average level of classroom substance use. Methods Drawn from the cross-national 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in The Netherlands, 5,642 Dutch adolescents (M-age = 14.29) reported on their substance use, EMC, and FTF interactions. Two-level multilevel analyses (participants nested within classrooms) were run. Results Electronic media communication was positively associated with adolescent substance use, though significantly more strongly with alcohol (beta = 0.15, SE beta = 0.02) than with tobacco (beta = 0.05, SE beta = 0.02, t (5,180) = 3.33, p < 0.001) or cannabis use (beta = 0.06, SE beta = 0.02, t (5,160) = 2.79, p < 0.01). Further, EMC strengthened several positive associations of FTF interactions and average classroom substance use with adolescent substance use. Conclusions Electronic media communication was uniquely associated with substance use, predominantly with alcohol use. Thus, adolescents' EMC and other online behaviors should not be left unnoticed in substance use research and prevention programs.
Stichworte
Multilevel analysis; Substance use; Electronic media communication; Adolescents; Face-to-face interactions
Erscheinungsjahr
2015
Zeitschriftentitel
International Journal of Public Health
Band
60
Ausgabe
2
Seite(n)
167-177
ISSN
1661-8556
eISSN
1661-8564
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/2707269

Zitieren

Gommans R, Stevens GWJM, Finne E, Cillessen AHN, Boniel-Nissim M, ter Bogt TFM. Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use. International Journal of Public Health. 2015;60(2):167-177.
Gommans, R., Stevens, G. W. J. M., Finne, E., Cillessen, A. H. N., Boniel-Nissim, M., & ter Bogt, T. F. M. (2015). Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use. International Journal of Public Health, 60(2), 167-177. doi:10.1007/s00038-014-0624-0
Gommans, R., Stevens, G. W. J. M., Finne, E., Cillessen, A. H. N., Boniel-Nissim, M., and ter Bogt, T. F. M. (2015). Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use. International Journal of Public Health 60, 167-177.
Gommans, R., et al., 2015. Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use. International Journal of Public Health, 60(2), p 167-177.
R. Gommans, et al., “Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use”, International Journal of Public Health, vol. 60, 2015, pp. 167-177.
Gommans, R., Stevens, G.W.J.M., Finne, E., Cillessen, A.H.N., Boniel-Nissim, M., ter Bogt, T.F.M.: Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use. International Journal of Public Health. 60, 167-177 (2015).
Gommans, Rob, Stevens, Gonneke W. J. M., Finne, Emily, Cillessen, Antonius H. N., Boniel-Nissim, Meyran, and ter Bogt, Tom F. M. “Frequent electronic media communication with friends is associated with higher adolescent substance use”. International Journal of Public Health 60.2 (2015): 167-177.

7 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

The decline in adolescent substance use across Europe and North America in the early twenty-first century: A result of the digital revolution?
De Looze M, van Dorsselaer S, Stevens GWJM, Boniel-Nissim M, Vieno A, Van den Eijnden RJJM., Int J Public Health 64(2), 2019
PMID: 30560293
Revisiting Factors Associated With Screen Time Media Use: A Structural Study Among School-Aged Adolescents.
Ngantcha M, Janssen E, Godeau E, Ehlinger V, Le-Nezet O, Beck F, Spilka S., J Phys Act Health 15(6), 2018
PMID: 29569992
Adolescents drink less: How, who and why? A review of the recent research literature.
Pape H, Rossow I, Brunborg GS., Drug Alcohol Rev 37 Suppl 1(), 2018
PMID: 29573020
Social Media Use and Episodic Heavy Drinking Among Adolescents.
Brunborg GS, Andreas JB, Kvaavik E., Psychol Rep 120(3), 2017
PMID: 28558617

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