The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients

Meister H, Landwehr M, Pyschny V, Wagner P, Walger M (2011)
Ear & Hearing 32(4): 459-467.

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Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
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Abstract / Bemerkung
Objectives: Sentence stress is a vital attribute of speech since it indicates the importance of specific words within an utterance. Basic acoustic correlates of stress are syllable duration, intensity, and fundamental frequency (F(0)). Objectives of the study were to determine cochlear implant (CI) users' perception of the acoustic correlates and to uncover which cues are used for stress identification. Design: Several experiments addressed the discrimination of changes in syllable duration, intensity, and F(0) as well as stress identification based on these cues. Moreover, the discrimination of combined cues and identification of stress in conversational speech was examined. Both natural utterances and artificial manipulations of the acoustic cues were used as stimuli. Results: Discrimination of syllable duration did not differ significantly between CI recipients and a control group of normal-hearing listeners. In contrast, CI users performed significantly worse on tasks of discrimination and stress identification based on F(0) as well as on intensity. Results from these measurements were significantly correlated with the ability to identify stress in conversational speech. Discrimination performance for covarying F(0) and intensity changes was more strongly correlated to identification performance than was found for discrimination of either F(0) or intensity alone. Syllable duration was not related to stress identification in natural utterances. Conclusions: The outcome emphasizes the importance of both F(0) and intensity for CI users' identification of sentence-based stress. Both cues were used separately for stress perception, but combining the cues provided extra benefit for most of the subjects.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
Ear & Hearing
Band
32
Ausgabe
4
Seite(n)
459-467
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Meister H, Landwehr M, Pyschny V, Wagner P, Walger M. The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients. Ear & Hearing. 2011;32(4):459-467.
Meister, H., Landwehr, M., Pyschny, V., Wagner, P., & Walger, M. (2011). The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients. Ear & Hearing, 32(4), 459-467. doi:10.1097/AUD.0b013e3182064882
Meister, H., Landwehr, M., Pyschny, V., Wagner, P., and Walger, M. (2011). The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients. Ear & Hearing 32, 459-467.
Meister, H., et al., 2011. The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients. Ear & Hearing, 32(4), p 459-467.
H. Meister, et al., “The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients”, Ear & Hearing, vol. 32, 2011, pp. 459-467.
Meister, H., Landwehr, M., Pyschny, V., Wagner, P., Walger, M.: The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients. Ear & Hearing. 32, 459-467 (2011).
Meister, Hartmut, Landwehr, Markus, Pyschny, Verena, Wagner, Petra, and Walger, Martin. “The Perception of Sentence Stress in Cochlear Implant Recipients”. Ear & Hearing 32.4 (2011): 459-467.

8 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

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Kyong JS, Scott SK, Rosen S, Howe TB, Agnew ZK, McGettigan C., J Cogn Neurosci 26(8), 2014
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The effect of emphasis and position on word identification by adult cochlear implant listeners.
Morris D, Magnusson L, Jönsson R., Clin Linguist Phon 27(12), 2013
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