Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts

Kroehne V, Heschel I, Schuegner F, Lasrich D, Bartsch JW, Jockusch H (2008)
JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE 12(5a): 1640-1648.

Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
 
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Abstract / Bemerkung
Tissue engineering of skeletal muscle from cultured cells has been attempted using a variety of synthetic and natural macromolecular scaffolds. Our study describes the application of artificial scaffolds (collagen sponges, CS) consisting of collagen-I with parallel pores (width 20-50 mu m) using the permanent myogenic cell line C2C12. CS were infiltrated with a high-density cell suspension, incubated in medium for proliferation of myoblasts prior to further culture in fusion medium to induce differentiation and formation of multinucleated myotubes. This resulted in a parallel arrangement of myotubes within the pore structures. CS with either proliferating cells or with myotubes were grafted into the beds of excised anterior tibial muscles of immunodeficient host mice. The recipient mice were transgenic for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) to determine a host contribution to the regenerated muscle tissue. Histological analysis 14-50 days after surgery showed that donor muscle fibres had formed in situ with host contributions in the outer portions of the regenerates. The function of the regenerates was assessed by direct electrical stimulation which resulted in the generation of mechanical force. Our study demonstrated that biodegradable CS with parallel pores support the formation of oriented muscle fibres and are compatible with force generation in regenerated muscle.
Stichworte
muscle regeneration; tissue engineering; collagen scaffold; oriented pore structure; culture; cell; transplantation; myoblast
Erscheinungsjahr
2008
Zeitschriftentitel
JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE
Band
12
Ausgabe
5a
Seite(n)
1640-1648
ISSN
1582-1838
eISSN
1582-4934
Page URI
https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/record/1585716

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Kroehne V, Heschel I, Schuegner F, Lasrich D, Bartsch JW, Jockusch H. Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts. JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE. 2008;12(5a):1640-1648.
Kroehne, V., Heschel, I., Schuegner, F., Lasrich, D., Bartsch, J. W., & Jockusch, H. (2008). Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts. JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE, 12(5a), 1640-1648. doi:10.1111/j.1582-4934.2008.00238.x
Kroehne, V., Heschel, I., Schuegner, F., Lasrich, D., Bartsch, J. W., and Jockusch, H. (2008). Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts. JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE 12, 1640-1648.
Kroehne, V., et al., 2008. Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts. JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE, 12(5a), p 1640-1648.
V. Kroehne, et al., “Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts”, JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE, vol. 12, 2008, pp. 1640-1648.
Kroehne, V., Heschel, I., Schuegner, F., Lasrich, D., Bartsch, J.W., Jockusch, H.: Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts. JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE. 12, 1640-1648 (2008).
Kroehne, V., Heschel, I., Schuegner, F., Lasrich, D., Bartsch, J. W., and Jockusch, Harald. “Use of a novel collagen matrix with oriented pore structure for muscle cell differentiation in cell culture and in grafts”. JOURNAL OF CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE 12.5a (2008): 1640-1648.

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