Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor

Döring F, Streubel M, Bräutigam A, Gowik U (2016)
Journal of Experimental Botany 67(10): 3053-3064.

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Abstract
Photorespiratory genes are expressed tissue-specific in the leaves of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. Most but not all of them are confined to the bundle sheath cells.One of the hallmarks of C-4 plants is the division of labor between two different photosynthetic cell types, the mesophyll and the bundle sheath cells. C-4 plants are of polyphyletic origin and, during the evolution of C-4 photosynthesis, the expression of thousands of genes was altered and many genes acquired a cell type-specific or preferential expression pattern. Several lines of evidence, including computational modeling and physiological and phylogenetic analyses, indicate that alterations in the expression of a key photorespiration-related gene, encoding the glycine decarboxylase P subunit, was an early and important step during C-4 evolution. Restricting the expression of this gene to the bundle sheath led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. We were interested in whether the expression of genes related to photorespiration remains bundle sheath specific in a fully optimized C-4 species. Therefore we analyzed the expression of photorespiratory and C-4 cycle genes using RNA in situ hybridization and transcriptome analysis of isolated mesophyll and bundle sheath cells in the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. It turns out that the C-4 metabolism of Sorghum is based solely on the NADP-dependent malic enzyme pathway. The majority of photorespiratory gene expression, with some important exceptions, is restricted to the bundle sheath.
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Döring F, Streubel M, Bräutigam A, Gowik U. Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany. 2016;67(10):3053-3064.
Döring, F., Streubel, M., Bräutigam, A., & Gowik, U. (2016). Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany, 67(10), 3053-3064. doi:10.1093/jxb/erw041
Döring, F., Streubel, M., Bräutigam, A., and Gowik, U. (2016). Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany 67, 3053-3064.
Döring, F., et al., 2016. Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany, 67(10), p 3053-3064.
F. Döring, et al., “Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor”, Journal of Experimental Botany, vol. 67, 2016, pp. 3053-3064.
Döring, F., Streubel, M., Bräutigam, A., Gowik, U.: Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor. Journal of Experimental Botany. 67, 3053-3064 (2016).
Döring, Florian, Streubel, Monika, Bräutigam, Andrea, and Gowik, Udo. “Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C-4 grass Sorghum bicolor”. Journal of Experimental Botany 67.10 (2016): 3053-3064.
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