Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition

Poth CH, Herwig A, Schneider WX (2015)
Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience 9: 176.

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Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
Abstract / Bemerkung
Visual perception is based on information processing during periods of eye fixations that are interrupted by fast saccadic eye movements. The ability to sample and relate information on task-relevant objects across fixations implies that correspondence between presaccadic and postsaccadic objects is established. Postsaccadic object information usually updates and overwrites information on the corresponding presaccadic object. The presaccadic object representation is then lost. In contrast, the presaccadic object is conserved when object correspondence is broken. This helps transsaccadic memory but it may impose attentional costs on object recognition. Therefore, we investigated how breaking object correspondence across the saccade affects postsaccadic object recognition. In Experiment 1, object correspondence was broken by a brief postsaccadic blank screen. Observers made a saccade to a peripheral object which was displaced during the saccade. This object reappeared either immediately after the saccade or after the blank screen. Within the postsaccadic object, a letter was briefly presented (terminated by a mask). Observers reported displacement direction and letter identity in different blocks. Breaking object correspondence by blanking improved displacement identification but deteriorated postsaccadic letter recognition. In Experiment 2, object correspondence was broken by changing the object’s contrast-polarity. There were no object displacements and observers only reported letter identity. Again, breaking object correspondence deteriorated postsaccadic letter recognition. These findings identify transsaccadic object correspondence as a key determinant of object recognition across the saccade. This is in line with the recent hypothesis that breaking object correspondence results in separate representations of presaccadic and postsaccadic objects which then compete for limited attentional processing resources (Schneider, 2013). Postsaccadic object recognition is then deteriorated because less resources are available for processing postsaccadic objects.
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Zeitschriftentitel
Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
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9
Artikelnummer
176
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Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
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Poth CH, Herwig A, Schneider WX. Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 2015;9: 176.
Poth, C. H., Herwig, A., & Schneider, W. X. (2015). Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 9, 176. doi:10.3389/fnsys.2015.00176
Poth, C. H., Herwig, A., and Schneider, W. X. (2015). Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience 9:176.
Poth, C.H., Herwig, A., & Schneider, W.X., 2015. Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 9: 176.
C.H. Poth, A. Herwig, and W.X. Schneider, “Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition”, Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, vol. 9, 2015, : 176.
Poth, C.H., Herwig, A., Schneider, W.X.: Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. 9, : 176 (2015).
Poth, Christian H., Herwig, Arvid, and Schneider, Werner X. “Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition”. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience 9 (2015): 176.
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5 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Calibration of peripheral perception of shape with and without saccadic eye movements.
Paeye C, Collins T, Cavanagh P, Herwig A., Atten Percept Psychophys 80(3), 2018
PMID: 29327331
Ultrahigh temporal resolution of visual presentation using gaming monitors and G-Sync.
Poth CH, Foerster RM, Behler C, Schwanecke U, Schneider WX, Botsch M., Behav Res Methods (), 2018
PMID: 29340970
Object discrepancy modulates feature prediction across eye movements.
Köller CP, Poth CH, Herwig A., Psychol Res (), 2018
PMID: 29387939

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