Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds.

Senna I, Parise C, Ernst MO (2015)
Scientific Reports 5: 14054.

Download
OA
Journal Article | Original Article | Published | English
Abstract
Perception can often be described as a statistically optimal inference process whereby noisy and incomplete sensory evidence is combined with prior knowledge about natural scene statistics. Previous evidence has shown that humans tend to underestimate the speed of unreliable moving visual stimuli. This finding has been interpreted in terms of a Bayesian prior favoring low speed, given that in natural visual scenes objects are mostly stationary or slowly-moving. Here we investigated whether an analogous tendency to underestimate speed also occurs in audition: even if the statistics of the visual environment seem to favor low speed, the statistics of the stimuli reaching the individual senses may differ across modalities, hence potentially leading to different priors. Here we observed a systematic bias for underestimating the speed of unreliable moving sounds. This finding suggests the existence of a slow-motion prior in audition, analogous to the one previously found in vision. The nervous system might encode the overall statistics of the world, rather than the specific properties of the signals reaching the individual senses.
Publishing Year
ISSN
Financial disclosure
Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
PUB-ID

Cite this

Senna I, Parise C, Ernst MO. Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds. Scientific Reports. 2015;5: 14054.
Senna, I., Parise, C., & Ernst, M. O. (2015). Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds. Scientific Reports, 5, 14054. doi:10.1038/srep14054
Senna, I., Parise, C., and Ernst, M. O. (2015). Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds. Scientific Reports 5:14054.
Senna, I., Parise, C., & Ernst, M.O., 2015. Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds. Scientific Reports, 5: 14054.
I. Senna, C. Parise, and M.O. Ernst, “Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds.”, Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 2015, : 14054.
Senna, I., Parise, C., Ernst, M.O.: Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds. Scientific Reports. 5, : 14054 (2015).
Senna, Irene, Parise, Cesare, and Ernst, Marc O. “Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds.”. Scientific Reports 5 (2015): 14054.
All files available under the following license(s):
Copyright Statement:
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. [...]
Main File(s)
File Name
Access Level
OA Open Access
Last Uploaded
2016-02-26T06:43:08Z

This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

5 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Auditory Localisation Biases Increase with Sensory Uncertainty.
Garcia SE, Jones PR, Rubin GS, Nardini M., Sci Rep 7(), 2017
PMID: 28074913
Auditory compensation for head rotation is incomplete.
Freeman TC, Culling JF, Akeroyd MA, Brimijoin WO., J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 43(2), 2017
PMID: 27841453
Looming sounds are perceived as faster than receding sounds.
Neuhoff JG., Cogn Res Princ Implic 1(1), 2016
PMID: 28180166
Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast.
Locke SM, Leung J, Carlile S., Sci Rep 6(), 2016
PMID: 27291488

21 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.


AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2014
Perceived rate of movement depends on contrast.
Thompson P., Vision Res. 22(3), 1982
PMID: 7090191
Human speed perception is contrast dependent.
Stone LS, Thompson P, Stone LS., Vision Res. 32(8), 1992
PMID: 1455726
Speed perception fogs up as visibility drops.
Snowden RJ, Stimpson N, Ruddle RA., Nature 392(6675), 1998
PMID: 9548251
The effect of contrast upon perceived speed: a general phenomenon?
Blakemore MR, Snowden RJ., Perception 28(1), 1999
PMID: 10627851
Foggy perception slows us down.
Pretto P, Bresciani JP, Rainer G, Bulthoff HH., Elife 1(), 2012
PMID: 23110253
Motion illusions as optimal percepts.
Weiss Y, Simoncelli EP, Adelson EH., Nat. Neurosci. 5(6), 2002
PMID: 12021763
Noise characteristics and prior expectations in human visual speed perception.
Stocker AA, Simoncelli EP., Nat. Neurosci. 9(4), 2006
PMID: 16547513
Bayesian motion estimation accounts for a surprising bias in 3D vision.
Welchman AE, Lam JM, Bulthoff HH., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105(33), 2008
PMID: 18697948
Changing expectations about speed alters perceived motion direction.
Sotiropoulos G, Seitz AR, Series P., Curr. Biol. 21(21), 2011
PMID: 22075425
The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling, and goodness of fit.
Wichmann FA, Hill NJ., Percept Psychophys 63(8), 2001
PMID: 11800458
Vision and the statistics of the visual environment.
Simoncelli EP., Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 13(2), 2003
PMID: 12744966
Optimal defocus estimation in individual natural images.
Burge J, Geisler WS., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108(40), 2011
PMID: 21930897
Cardinal rules: visual orientation perception reflects knowledge of environmental statistics.
Girshick AR, Landy MS, Simoncelli EP., Nat. Neurosci. 14(7), 2011
PMID: 21642976
Natural auditory scene statistics shapes human spatial hearing.
Parise CV, Knorre K, Ernst MO., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111(16), 2014
PMID: 24711409

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 1996
Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals.
Meyer GF, Wuerger SM., Neuroreport 12(11), 2001
PMID: 11496148
1/f noise in human cognition.
Gilden DL, Thornton T, Mallon MW., Science 267(5205), 1995
PMID: 7892611
The most expensive painting in the world.
Gregory RL., Perception 36(1), 2007
PMID: 17357701
Discrimination of sound source velocity in human listeners.
Carlile S, Best V., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111(2), 2002
PMID: 11863159
Upper limits of auditory rotational motion perception.
Feron FX, Frissen I, Boissinot J, Guastavino C., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128(6), 2010
PMID: 21218902

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 26370720
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar