Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany

David M, Borde T, Brenne S, Henrich W, Breckenkamp J, Razum O (2015)
PLoS ONE 10(5): e0127489.

Download
Es wurde kein Volltext hochgeladen. Nur Publikationsnachweis!
Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
Autor
; ; ; ; ;
Abstract / Bemerkung
Objective The frequency of caesarean section delivery varies between countries and social groups. Among other factors, it is determined by the quality of obstetrics care. Rates of elective (planned) and emergency (in-labor) caesareans may also vary between immigrants (first generation), their offspring (second- and third-generation women), and non-immigrants because of access and language barriers. Other important points to be considered are whether caesarean section indications and the neonatal outcomes differ in babies delivered by caesarean between immigrants, their offspring, and non-immigrants. Methods A standardized interview on admission to delivery wards at three Berlin obstetric hospitals was performed in a 12-month period in 2011/2012. Questions on socio-demographic and care aspects and on migration (immigrated herself vs. second- and third-generation women vs. non-immigrant) and acculturation status were included. Data was linked with information from the expectant mothers' antenatal records and with perinatal data routinely documented in the hospital. Regression modeling was used to adjust for age, parity and socio-economic status. Results The caesarean section rates for immigrants, second- and third-generation women, and non-immigrant women were similar. Neither indications for caesarean section delivery nor neonatal outcomes showed statistically significant differences. The only difference found was a somewhat higher rate of crash caesarean sections per 100 births among first generation immigrants compared to non-immigrants. Conclusion Unlike earlier German studies and current studies from other European countries, this study did not find an increased rate of caesarean sections among immigrants, as well as second- and third-generation women, with the possible exception of a small high-risk group. This indicates an equally high quality of perinatal care for women with and without a migration history.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
PLoS ONE
Band
10
Zeitschriftennummer
5
Artikelnummer
e0127489
ISSN
PUB-ID

Zitieren

David M, Borde T, Brenne S, Henrich W, Breckenkamp J, Razum O. Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(5): e0127489.
David, M., Borde, T., Brenne, S., Henrich, W., Breckenkamp, J., & Razum, O. (2015). Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany. PLoS ONE, 10(5), e0127489. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127489
David, M., Borde, T., Brenne, S., Henrich, W., Breckenkamp, J., and Razum, O. (2015). Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany. PLoS ONE 10:e0127489.
David, M., et al., 2015. Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany. PLoS ONE, 10(5): e0127489.
M. David, et al., “Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany”, PLoS ONE, vol. 10, 2015, : e0127489.
David, M., Borde, T., Brenne, S., Henrich, W., Breckenkamp, J., Razum, O.: Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany. PLoS ONE. 10, : e0127489 (2015).
David, Matthias, Borde, Theda, Brenne, Silke, Henrich, Wolfgang, Breckenkamp, Jürgen, and Razum, Oliver. “Caesarean Section Frequency among Immigrants, Second- and Third-Generation Women, and Non-Immigrants: Prospective Study in Berlin/Germany”. PLoS ONE 10.5 (2015): e0127489.

4 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Barrier-free communication in maternity care of allophone migrants: BRIDGE study protocol.
Origlia Ikhilor P, Hasenberg G, Kurth E, Stocker Kalberer B, Cignacco E, Pehlke-Milde J., J Adv Nurs 74(2), 2018
PMID: 28833465
Migration Background Should Be Considered.
Razum O, David M., Dtsch Arztebl Int 115(26), 2018
PMID: 30017030

34 References

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.


AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Postpartum maternal mortality and cesarean delivery.
Deneux-Tharaux C, Carmona E, Bouvier-Colle MH, Breart G., Obstet Gynecol 108(3 Pt 1), 2006
PMID: 16946213
The health implications of birth by Caesarean section.
Hyde MJ, Mostyn A, Modi N, Kemp PR., Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 87(1), 2011
PMID: 21815988
Caesarean section rates in immigrant and native women in Spain: the importance of geographical origin and type of hospital for delivery.
Rio I, Castello A, Barona C, Jane M, Mas R, Rebagliato M, Bosch S, Martinez E, Bolumar F., Eur J Public Health 20(5), 2010
PMID: 20522515
Caesarean section in the world: a new ecological approach.
Zizza A, Tinelli A, Malvasi A, Barbone E, Stark M, De Donno A, Guido M., J Prev Med Hyg 52(4), 2011
PMID: 22442920
Appropriate technology for birth.
AUTHOR UNKNOWN, Lancet 2(8452), 1985
PMID: 2863457

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2012
Pregnancy outcome of migrant women and integration policy: a systematic review of the international literature.
Bollini P, Pampallona S, Wanner P, Kupelnick B., Soc Sci Med 68(3), 2008
PMID: 19042065
Stillbirths and infant deaths among migrants in industrialized countries.
Gissler M, Alexander S, MacFarlane A, Small R, Stray-Pedersen B, Zeitlin J, Zimbeck M, Gagnon A., Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 88(2), 2009
PMID: 19096947

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
McCowan LME. Ethnicity and risk of Caesarean section in a term, nulliparous New Zealand obstetric cohort
AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2013
Acculturation and cardiovascular reactivity of second-generation Turkish migrants in Germany.
Bongard S, Pogge SF, Arslaner H, Rohrmann S, Hodapp V., J Psychosom Res 53(3), 2002
PMID: 12217454
[A basic set of indicators for mapping migrant status. Recommendations for epidemiological practice].
Schenk L, Bau AM, Borde T, Butler J, Lampert T, Neuhauser H, Razum O, Weilandt C., Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz 49(9), 2006
PMID: 16927038

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2014

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Rates of caesarean section: analysis of global, regional and national estimates.
Betran AP, Merialdi M, Lauer JA, Bing-Shun W, Thomas J, Van Look P, Wagner M., Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 21(2), 2007
PMID: 17302638
Elective cesarean section and decision making: a critical review of the literature.
McCourt C, Weaver J, Statham H, Beake S, Gamble J, Creedy DK., Birth 34(1), 2007
PMID: 17324181

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Cesarean section among immigrants in Norway.
Vangen S, Stoltenberg C, Skrondal A, Magnus P, Stray-Pedersen B., Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 79(7), 2000
PMID: 10929954

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
International migration and caesarean birth: a systematic review and meta-analysis
AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2013
Immigrants present improved obstetric and neonatal outcomes compared to native women. A northern greek population analysis.
Margioula-Siarkou C, Petousis S, Kalogiannidis I, Dagklis T, Traianos V, Goutzioulis M, Prapas N, Agorastos T., J Immigr Minor Health 15(2), 2013
PMID: 23054544
Delivery and immigration: the experience of an Italian hospital.
Rizzo N, Ciardelli V, Gandolfi Colleoni G, Bonavita B, Parisio C, Farina A, Bovicelli L., Eur. J. Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod. Biol. 116(2), 2004
PMID: 15358458
Migrants and obstetrics in Austria--applying a new questionnaire shows differences in obstetric care and outcome.
Oberaigner W, Leitner H, Oberaigner K, Marth C, Pinzger G, Concin H, Steiner H, Hofmann H, Wagner T, Mortl M, Ramoni A., Wien. Klin. Wochenschr. 125(1-2), 2013
PMID: 23292644
Racial/ethnic differences in the likelihood of cesarean delivery, California.
Braveman P, Egerter S, Edmonston F, Verdon M., Am J Public Health 85(5), 1995
PMID: 7733420
Management of the pregnant immigrant woman in the decade 1992-2001.
Diani F, Zanconato G, Foschi F, Turinetto A, Franchi M., J Obstet Gynaecol 23(6), 2003
PMID: 14617461
Ethnicity and mode of delivery in 'low-risk' first-time mothers, East London, 1988-1997.
Ibison JM., Eur. J. Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod. Biol. 118(2), 2005
PMID: 15653203
Rates of obstetric intervention during birth and selected maternal and perinatal outcomes for low risk women born in Australia compared to those born overseas
AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2013
Racial differences in cesareans: an analysis of U.S. 2001 National Inpatient Sample Data.
Kabir AA, Pridjian G, Steinmann WC, Herrera EA, Khan MM., Obstet Gynecol 105(4), 2005
PMID: 15802395
Perinatal complications and caesarean delivery among foreign-born and Australian-born women in Western Australia, 1998–2006
AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2012
Caesarean sections and breastfeeding initiation among migrants in Switzerland.
Merten S, Wyss C, Ackermann-Liebrich U., Int J Public Health 52(4), 2007
PMID: 18030953
Ethnic variation between white European women in labour outcomes in a setting in which the management of labour is standardised-a healthy migrant effect?
AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2011

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 2011

Export

Markieren/ Markierung löschen
Markierte Publikationen

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

Dieser Datensatz im Web of Science®

Quellen

PMID: 25985437
PubMed | Europe PMC

Suchen in

Google Scholar