Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus

Schindler S, Wegrzyn M, Steppacher I, Kißler J (2015)
Journal of Neuroscience 35(15): 6010-6019.

Download
No fulltext has been uploaded. References only!
Journal Article | Original Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Publishing Year
ISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Schindler S, Wegrzyn M, Steppacher I, Kißler J. Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus. Journal of Neuroscience. 2015;35(15):6010-6019.
Schindler, S., Wegrzyn, M., Steppacher, I., & Kißler, J. (2015). Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(15), 6010-6019. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3346-14.2015
Schindler, S., Wegrzyn, M., Steppacher, I., and Kißler, J. (2015). Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus. Journal of Neuroscience 35, 6010-6019.
Schindler, S., et al., 2015. Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(15), p 6010-6019.
S. Schindler, et al., “Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus”, Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 35, 2015, pp. 6010-6019.
Schindler, S., Wegrzyn, M., Steppacher, I., Kißler, J.: Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus. Journal of Neuroscience. 35, 6010-6019 (2015).
Schindler, Sebastian, Wegrzyn, Martin, Steppacher, Inga, and Kißler, Johanna. “Perceived Communicative Context and Emotional Content Amplify Visual Word Processing in the Fusiform Gyrus”. Journal of Neuroscience 35.15 (2015): 6010-6019.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

14 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Brain-to-brain coupling during handholding is associated with pain reduction.
Goldstein P, Weissman-Fogel I, Dumas G, Shamay-Tsoory SG., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115(11), 2018
PMID: 29483250
Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing.
Bublatzky F, Pittig A, Schupp HT, Alpers GW., Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 12(5), 2017
PMID: 28158672
Processing of fair and unfair offers in the ultimatum game under social observation.
Peterburs J, Voegler R, Liepelt R, Schulze A, Wilhelm S, Ocklenburg S, Straube T., Sci Rep 7(), 2017
PMID: 28276510
The role of touch in regulating inter-partner physiological coupling during empathy for pain.
Goldstein P, Weissman-Fogel I, Shamay-Tsoory SG., Sci Rep 7(1), 2017
PMID: 28607375
The sound and the fury: Late positive potential is sensitive to sound affect.
Brown DR, Cavanagh JF., Psychophysiology 54(12), 2017
PMID: 28726287
Uninstructed BIAT faking when ego depleted or in normal state: differential effect on brain and behavior.
Wolff W, Schindler S, Englert C, Brand R, Kissler J., BMC Neurosci 17(1), 2016
PMID: 27142046
Adapting another person's affective state modulates brain potentials to unpleasant pictures.
Paul S, Endrass T, Kathmann N, Simon D., Biol Psychol 120(), 2016
PMID: 27587332
Cerebral correlates of faking: evidence from a brief implicit association test on doping attitudes.
Schindler S, Wolff W, Kissler JM, Brand R., Front Behav Neurosci 9(), 2015
PMID: 26074798

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 25878274
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar