Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany

Kleiner S, Schunck R, Schoemann K (2015)
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56(1): 98-113.

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Zeitschriftenaufsatz | Veröffentlicht | Englisch
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Abstract / Bemerkung
This paper takes a comparative approach to the topic of work time and health, asking whether weekly work hours matter for mental health. We hypothesize that these relationships differ within the United States and Germany, given the more regulated work time environments within Germany and the greater incentives to work long hours in the United States. We further hypothesize that German women will experience greatest penalties to long hours. We use data from the German Socioeconomic Panel and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine hours effects on mental health score at midlife. The results support our initial hypothesis. In Germany, longer work time is associated with worse mental health, while in the United States, as seen in previous research, the associations are more complex. Our results do not show greater mental health penalties for German women and suggest instead a selection effect into work hours operating by gender.
Erscheinungsjahr
Zeitschriftentitel
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Band
56
Zeitschriftennummer
1
Seite
98-113
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Kleiner S, Schunck R, Schoemann K. Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 2015;56(1):98-113.
Kleiner, S., Schunck, R., & Schoemann, K. (2015). Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 56(1), 98-113. doi:10.1177/0022146514568348
Kleiner, S., Schunck, R., and Schoemann, K. (2015). Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany. Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56, 98-113.
Kleiner, S., Schunck, R., & Schoemann, K., 2015. Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 56(1), p 98-113.
S. Kleiner, R. Schunck, and K. Schoemann, “Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany”, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 56, 2015, pp. 98-113.
Kleiner, S., Schunck, R., Schoemann, K.: Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 56, 98-113 (2015).
Kleiner, Sibyl, Schunck, Reinhard, and Schoemann, Klaus. “Different Contexts, Different Effects? Work Time and Mental Health in the United States and Germany”. Journal of Health and Social Behavior 56.1 (2015): 98-113.

4 Zitationen in Europe PMC

Daten bereitgestellt von Europe PubMed Central.

Factors Related to Alcohol Consumption Among Japanese Physicians.
Ohida N, Otsuka Y, Kaneita Y, Nakagome S, Jike M, Itani O, Ohida T., Asia Pac J Public Health (), 2018
PMID: 29457499
Time Spent Commuting to Work and Mental Health: Evidence From 13 Waves of an Australian Cohort Study.
Milner A, Badland H, Kavanagh A, LaMontagne AD., Am J Epidemiol 186(6), 2017
PMID: 28453601
Working Hours Mismatch, Macroeconomic Changes, and Mental Well-being in Europe.
De Moortel D, Thévenon O, De Witte H, Vanroelen C., J Health Soc Behav 58(2), 2017
PMID: 28661780

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