Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women

Wallmann-Sperlich B, Bucksch J, Schneider S, Froboese I (2014)
BMC Public Health 14.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
Background: Sitting time is ubiquitous for most adults in developed countries and is most prevalent in three domains: in the workplace, during transport and during leisure time. The correlates of prolonged sitting time in workplace settings are not well understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the gender-specific associations between the socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of working German adults (n = 1515; 747 men; 43.5 +/- 11.0 years) completed questionnaires regarding domain-specific sitting times and physical activity (PA) and answered statements concerning beliefs about sitting. To identify gender-specific correlates of work-related sitting time, we used a series of linear regressions. Results: The overall median was 2 hours of work-related sitting time/day. Regression analyses showed for men (beta = -.43) and for women (beta = -.32) that work-related PA was negatively associated with work-related sitting time, but leisure-related PA was not a significant correlate. For women only, transport-related PA (beta = -.07) was a negative correlate of work-related sitting time, suggesting increased sitting times during work with decreased PA in transport. Education and income levels were positively associated, and in women only, age (beta = -.14) had a negative correlation with work-related sitting time. For both genders, TV-related sitting time was negatively associated with work-related sitting time. The only association with cognitive correlates was found in men for the belief 'Sitting for long periods does not matter to me' (beta = .10) expressing a more positive attitude towards sitting with increasing sitting durations. Conclusions: The present findings show that in particular, higher educated men and women as well as young women are high-risk groups to target for reducing prolonged work-related sitting time. In addition, our findings propose considering increasing transport-related PA, especially in women, as well as promoting recreation-related PA in conjunction with efforts to reduce long work-related sitting times.
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Wallmann-Sperlich B, Bucksch J, Schneider S, Froboese I. Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women. BMC Public Health. 2014;14.
Wallmann-Sperlich, B., Bucksch, J., Schneider, S., & Froboese, I. (2014). Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women. BMC Public Health, 14.
Wallmann-Sperlich, B., Bucksch, J., Schneider, S., and Froboese, I. (2014). Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women. BMC Public Health 14.
Wallmann-Sperlich, B., et al., 2014. Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women. BMC Public Health, 14.
B. Wallmann-Sperlich, et al., “Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women”, BMC Public Health, vol. 14, 2014.
Wallmann-Sperlich, B., Bucksch, J., Schneider, S., Froboese, I.: Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women. BMC Public Health. 14, (2014).
Wallmann-Sperlich, Birgit, Bucksch, Jens, Schneider, Sven, and Froboese, Ingo. “Socio-demographic, behavioural and cognitive correlates of work-related sitting time in German men and women”. BMC Public Health 14 (2014).
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3 Citations in Europe PMC

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Office workers' objectively assessed total and prolonged sitting time: Individual-level correlates and worksite variations.
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Busschaert C, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Van Cauwenberg J, Cardon G, De Cocker K., Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 13(), 2016
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Hadgraft NT, Lynch BM, Clark BK, Healy GN, Owen N, Dunstan DW., BMC Public Health 15(), 2015
PMID: 26374514

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