Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music

Bläsing B (2015)
Frontiers in Psychology 5: 1500.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
According to event segmentation theory, action perception depends on sensory cues and prior knowledge, and the segmentation of observed actions is crucial for understanding and memorizing these actions. While most activities in everyday life are characterized by external goals and interaction with objects or persons, this does not necessarily apply to dance-like actions. We investigated to what extent visual familiarity of the observed movement and accompanying music influence the segmentation of a dance phrase in dancers of different skill level and non-dancers. In Experiment 1, dancers and non-dancers repeatedly watched a video clip showing a dancer performing a choreographed dance phrase and indicated segment boundaries by key press. Dancers generally defined less segment boundaries than non-dancers, specifically in the first trials in which visual familiarity with the phrase was low. Music increased the number of segment boundaries in the non-dancers and decreased it in the dancers. The results suggest that dance expertise reduces the number of perceived segment boundaries in an observed dance phrase, and that the ways visual familiarity and music affect movement segmentation are modulated by dance expertise. In a second experiment, motor experience was added as factor, based on empirical evidence suggesting that action perception is modified by visual and motor expertise in different ways. In Experiment 2, the same task as in Experiment 1 was performed by dance amateurs, and was repeated by the same participants after they had learned to dance the presented dance phrase. Less segment boundaries were defined in the middle trials after participants had learned to dance the phrase, and music reduced the number of segment boundaries before learning. The results suggest that specific motor experience of the observed movement influences its perception and anticipation and makes segmentation broader, but not to the same degree as dance expertise on a professional level.
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Bläsing B. Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music. Frontiers in Psychology. 2015;5: 1500.
Bläsing, B. (2015). Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music. Frontiers in Psychology, 5: 1500.
Bläsing, B. (2015). Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music. Frontiers in Psychology 5:1500.
Bläsing, B., 2015. Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music. Frontiers in Psychology, 5: 1500.
B. Bläsing, “Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music”, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 5, 2015, : 1500.
Bläsing, B.: Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music. Frontiers in Psychology. 5, : 1500 (2015).
Bläsing, Bettina. “Segmentation of dance movement: effects of expertise, visual familiarty, motor experience and music”. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (2015): 1500.
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