The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task

Seegelke C, Hughes C, Knoblauch A, Schack T (2015)
Experimental Brain Research 233(2): 529-538.

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Abstract
The present experiment examined the influence of final target position on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task in which the required object orientation at the first target position was unconstrained. Participants grasped a cylindrical object from a home position, placed it at an intermediate position in a freely chosen orientation, and subsequently placed it at one of four final target positions. Considerable inter-individual differences in initial grasp selection were observed which also led to differences in final grasp postures. Whereas some participants strongly adjusted their initial grasp postures to the final target orientation, and thus showed a preference for end-state comfort, other participants showed virtually no adjustment in initial grasp postures, hence satisfying initial-state comfort. Interestingly, as intermediate grasp postures were similar regardless of initial grasp adjustment, intermediate-state comfort was prioritized by all participants. These results provide further evidence for the interaction of multiple action selection constraints in grasp posture planning during multi-segment object manipulation tasks. Whereas some constraints may take strict precedence in a given task, other constraints may be more flexible and weighted differently among participants. This differentiated weighting leads to task- and subject-specific constraint hierarchies and is reflected in inter-individual differences in grasp selection.
Publishing Year
ISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Seegelke C, Hughes C, Knoblauch A, Schack T. The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research. 2015;233(2):529-538.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C., Knoblauch, A., & Schack, T. (2015). The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research, 233(2), 529-538.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C., Knoblauch, A., and Schack, T. (2015). The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research 233, 529-538.
Seegelke, C., et al., 2015. The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research, 233(2), p 529-538.
C. Seegelke, et al., “The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task”, Experimental Brain Research, vol. 233, 2015, pp. 529-538.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C., Knoblauch, A., Schack, T.: The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research. 233, 529-538 (2015).
Seegelke, Christian, Hughes, Charmayne, Knoblauch, Andreas, and Schack, Thomas. “The influence of reducing intermediate target constraints on grasp posture planning during a three-segment object manipulation task”. Experimental Brain Research 233.2 (2015): 529-538.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

1 Citation in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

32 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.


C, Acta Psychol 144(), 2013
Representation of grasp postures and anticipatory motor planning in children.
Stockel T, Hughes CM, Schack T., Psychol Res 76(6), 2012
PMID: 22075763
Bimanual grasp planning reflects changing rather than fixed constraint dominance.
van der Wel RP, Rosenbaum DA., Exp Brain Res 205(3), 2010
PMID: 20658129
The case for motor involvement in perceiving conspecifics.
Wilson M, Knoblich G., Psychol Bull 131(3), 2005
PMID: 15869341

HJ, Adv Eng Softw Workst 8(), 1986

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 25370347
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar