Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response

Roeser K, Meule A, Kübler A, Schlarb A (2012)
Chronobiology International 29(7): 955-960.

Journal Article | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ; ;
Abstract
Eveningness preference has been associated with lower sleep quality and higher stress response compared with morningness preference. In the current study, female morning (n = 27) and evening (n = 28) types completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and were additionally challenged with an arithmetic stress-induction task. Evening types reported lower subjective sleep quality and longer sleep latency than morning types. Furthermore, evening types reported higher self-perceived stress after the task than morning types. Subjective sleep quality fully mediated the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and stress response. Poor sleep quality may, therefore, contribute to the elevated health risk in evening types. (Author correspondence: karolin.roeser@uni-wuerzburg.de) Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/07420528.2012.699124
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Roeser K, Meule A, Kübler A, Schlarb A. Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response. Chronobiology International. 2012;29(7):955-960.
Roeser, K., Meule, A., Kübler, A., & Schlarb, A. (2012). Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response. Chronobiology International, 29(7), 955-960.
Roeser, K., Meule, A., Kübler, A., and Schlarb, A. (2012). Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response. Chronobiology International 29, 955-960.
Roeser, K., et al., 2012. Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response. Chronobiology International, 29(7), p 955-960.
K. Roeser, et al., “Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response”, Chronobiology International, vol. 29, 2012, pp. 955-960.
Roeser, K., Meule, A., Kübler, A., Schlarb, A.: Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response. Chronobiology International. 29, 955-960 (2012).
Roeser, K., Meule, A., Kübler, A., and Schlarb, Angelika. “Subjective sleep quality exclusively mediates the relationship between morningness-eveningness preference and self-perceived stress response”. Chronobiology International 29.7 (2012): 955-960.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

10 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Sleep assessment for better understanding skin composition.
Albuquerque RG, Hirotsu C, Tufik S, Andersen ML., Brain Behav. Immun. 49(), 2015
PMID: 26234758
Poor sleep quality is associated with a negative cognitive bias and decreased sustained attention.
Gobin CM, Banks JB, Fins AI, Tartar JL., J Sleep Res 24(5), 2015
PMID: 25913483
The influence of sleep complaints on the association between chronotype and negative emotionality in young adults.
Simor P, Zavecz Z, Palosi V, Torok C, Koteles F., Chronobiol. Int. 32(1), 2015
PMID: 25003651
Daytime sleepiness, poor sleep quality, eveningness chronotype, and common mental disorders among Chilean college students.
Concepcion T, Barbosa C, Velez JC, Pepper M, Andrade A, Gelaye B, Yanez D, Williams MA., J Am Coll Health 62(7), 2014
PMID: 24810953
Morningness-eveningness interferes with perceived health, physical activity, diet and stress levels in working women: a cross-sectional study.
Haraszti RA, Purebl G, Salavecz G, Poole L, Dockray S, Steptoe A., Chronobiol. Int. 31(7), 2014
PMID: 24766191
Chronotype, bed timing and total sleep time in seniors.
Monk TH, Buysse DJ., Chronobiol. Int. 31(5), 2014
PMID: 24517139

43 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.


AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
Phase relationships between sleep-wake cycle and underlying circadian rhythms in Morningness-Eveningness.
Mongrain V, Lavoie S, Selmaoui B, Paquet J, Dumont M., J. Biol. Rhythms 19(3), 2004
PMID: 15155011

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0

Ong, J. Clin. Sleep Med 3(), 2008
Ethics and methods for biological rhythm research on animals and human beings.
Portaluppi F, Smolensky MH, Touitou Y., Chronobiol. Int. 27(9-10), 2010
PMID: 20969531
Sleep and depression--results from psychobiological studies: an overview.
Riemann D, Berger M, Voderholzer U., Biol Psychol 57(1-3), 2001
PMID: 11454435
Of larks and hearts--morningness/eveningness, heart rate variability and cardiovascular stress response at different times of day.
Roeser K, Obergfell F, Meule A, Vogele C, Schlarb AA, Kubler A., Physiol. Behav. 106(2), 2012
PMID: 22330324

Sobel, 1982
Morningness/eveningness and the need for sleep.
Taillard J, Philip P, Bioulac B., J Sleep Res 8(4), 1999
PMID: 10646169
Circadian phase preference in college students: relationships with psychological functioning and academics.
Taylor DJ, Clay KC, Bramoweth AD, Sethi K, Roane BM., Chronobiol. Int. 28(6), 2011
PMID: 21797783

AUTHOR UNKNOWN, 0
The influence of morningness-eveningness on anxiety and cardiovascular responses to stress.
Willis TA, O'Connor DB, Smith L., Physiol. Behav. 85(2), 2005
PMID: 15924909
Social jetlag: misalignment of biological and social time.
Wittmann M, Dinich J, Merrow M, Roenneberg T., Chronobiol. Int. 23(1-2), 2006
PMID: 16687322

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 22823878
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar