Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways

Kianianmomeni A, Hallmann A (2015)
Current Genetics 61(1): 3-18.

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Abstract
Photosynthetic organisms, e.g., plants including green algae, use a sophisticated light-sensing system, composed of primary photoreceptors and additional downstream signaling components, to monitor changes in the ambient light environment towards adjust their growth and development. Although a variety of cellular processes, e.g., initiation of cleavage division and final cellular differentiation, have been shown to be light-regulated in the green alga Volvox carteri, little is known about the underlying light perception and signaling pathways. This multicellular alga possesses at least 12 photoreceptors, i.e., one phototropin (VcPhot), four cryptochromes (VcCRYa, VcCRYp, VcCRYd1, and VcCRYd2), and seven members of rhodopsin-like photoreceptors (VR1, VChR1, VChR2, VcHKR1, VcHKR2, VcHKR3, and VcHKR4), which display distinct light-dependent chemical processes based on their protein architectures and associated chromophores. Gene expression analyses could show that the transcript levels of some of the photoreceptor genes (e.g., VChR1 and VcHKR1) accumulate during division cleavages, while others (e.g., VcCRYa, VcCRYp, and VcPhot) accumulate during final cellular differentiation. However, the pattern of transcript accumulation changes when the alga switches to the sexual development. Eight photoreceptor genes, e.g., VcPhot, VcCRYp, and VcHKR1, are highly expressed in the somatic cells, while only the animal-type rhodopsin VR1 was found to be highly expressed in the reproductive cells/embryos during both asexual and sexual life cycles. Moreover, accumulation of VChR1 and VcCRYa transcripts is more sensitive to light and changes in response to more than one light quality. Obviously, different regulatory mechanisms underlying gene expression control transcript accumulation of photoreceptors not only during development, but also in a cell-type specific way and in response to various external signals such as light quality. The transcriptional patterns described in this study show that Volvox photoreceptors are mostly expressed in a cell-type specific manner. This gives reason to believe that cell-type specific light-signaling pathways allow differential regulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to the environmental light cues.
Publishing Year
ISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Kianianmomeni A, Hallmann A. Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways. Current Genetics. 2015;61(1):3-18.
Kianianmomeni, A., & Hallmann, A. (2015). Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways. Current Genetics, 61(1), 3-18.
Kianianmomeni, A., and Hallmann, A. (2015). Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways. Current Genetics 61, 3-18.
Kianianmomeni, A., & Hallmann, A., 2015. Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways. Current Genetics, 61(1), p 3-18.
A. Kianianmomeni and A. Hallmann, “Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways”, Current Genetics, vol. 61, 2015, pp. 3-18.
Kianianmomeni, A., Hallmann, A.: Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways. Current Genetics. 61, 3-18 (2015).
Kianianmomeni, Arash, and Hallmann, Armin. “Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways”. Current Genetics 61.1 (2015): 3-18.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

1 Citation in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

68 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Signal transduction in the sexual life of Chlamydomonas.
Quarmby LM., Plant Mol. Biol. 26(5), 1994
PMID: 7858190
Dissection of eukaryotic transmembrane signalling using Chlamydomonas.
Quarmby LM, Hartzell HC., Trends Pharmacol. Sci. 15(9), 1994
PMID: 7992388

M, J Plankton Res 26(), 2004

H, Plant Cell Physiol 20(), 1979
Two-component systems and their co-option for eukaryotic signal transduction.
Schaller GE, Shiu SH, Armitage JP., Curr. Biol. 21(9), 2011
PMID: 21549954

OA, Proc Natl Acad Sci 99(), 2002
Phytochromes and cryptochromes in the entrainment of the Arabidopsis circadian clock.
Somers DE, Devlin PF, Kay SA., Science 282(5393), 1998
PMID: 9822379

U, Limnol Oceanogr 31(), 1986
The cryb mutation identifies cryptochrome as a circadian photoreceptor in Drosophila.
Stanewsky R, Kaneko M, Emery P, Beretta B, Wager-Smith K, Kay SA, Rosbash M, Hall JC., Cell 95(5), 1998
PMID: 9845370

RC, Proc Natl Acad Sci 77(), 1980
Two-component signal transduction.
Stock AM, Robinson VL, Goudreau PN., Annu. Rev. Biochem. 69(), 2000
PMID: 10966457
Archaeal-type rhodopsins in Chlamydomonas: model structure and intracellular localization.
Suzuki T, Yamasaki K, Fujita S, Oda K, Iseki M, Yoshida K, Watanabe M, Daiyasu H, Toh H, Asamizu E, Tabata S, Miura K, Fukuzawa H, Nakamura S, Takahashi T., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 301(3), 2003
PMID: 12565839
Role for YakA, cAMP, and protein kinase A in regulation of stress responses of Dictyostelium discoideum cells.
Taminato A, Bagattini R, Gorjao R, Chen G, Kuspa A, Souza GM., Mol. Biol. Cell 13(7), 2002
PMID: 12134067
Phototropin influence on eyespot development and regulation of phototactic behavior in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.
Trippens J, Greiner A, Schellwat J, Neukam M, Rottmann T, Lu Y, Kateriya S, Hegemann P, Kreimer G., Plant Cell 24(11), 2012
PMID: 23204408

L, Microbiol 150(), 2004
Cryptochromes define a novel circadian clock mechanism in monarch butterflies that may underlie sun compass navigation.
Zhu H, Sauman I, Yuan Q, Casselman A, Emery-Le M, Emery P, Reppert SM., PLoS Biol. 6(1), 2008
PMID: 18184036

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 25117716
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar