It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives

Schindler S, Wegrzyn M, Steppacher I, Kißler J (2014)
Frontiers in Psychology 5.

Download
OA
Journal Article | Published | English
Abstract
Language has an intrinsically evaluative and communicative function. Words can serve to describe emotional traits and states in others and communicate evaluations. Using electroencephalography (EEG), we investigate how the cerebral processing of emotional trait adjectives is modulated by their perceived communicative sender in anticipation of an evaluation. 16 students were videotaped while they described themselves. They were told that a stranger would evaluate their personality based on this recording by endorsing trait adjectives. In a control condition a computer program supposedly randomly selected the adjectives. Actually, both conditions were random. A larger parietal N1 was found for adjectives in the supposedly human-generated condition. This indicates that more visual attention is allocated to the presented adjectives when putatively interacting with a human. Between 400 and 700 ms a fronto-central main effect of emotion was found. Positive, and in tendency also negative adjectives, led to a larger late positive potential (LPP) compared to neutral adjectives. A centro-parietal interaction in the LPP-window was due to larger LPP amplitudes for negative compared to neutral adjectives within the ‘human sender’ condition. Larger LPP amplitudes are related to stimulus elaboration and memory consolidation. Participants responded more to emotional content particularly when presented in a meaningful ‘human’ context. This was first observed in the early posterior negativity window (210–260 ms). But the significant interaction between sender and emotion reached only trend-level on post hoc tests. Our results specify differential effects of even implied communicative partners on emotional language processing. They show that anticipating evaluation by a communicative partner alone is sufficient to increase the relevance of particularly emotional adjectives, given a seemingly realistic interactive setting.
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
Financial disclosure
Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
PUB-ID

Cite this

Schindler S, Wegrzyn M, Steppacher I, Kißler J. It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives. Frontiers in Psychology. 2014;5.
Schindler, S., Wegrzyn, M., Steppacher, I., & Kißler, J. (2014). It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives. Frontiers in Psychology, 5.
Schindler, S., Wegrzyn, M., Steppacher, I., and Kißler, J. (2014). It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
Schindler, S., et al., 2014. It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives. Frontiers in Psychology, 5.
S. Schindler, et al., “It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives”, Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 5, 2014.
Schindler, S., Wegrzyn, M., Steppacher, I., Kißler, J.: It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives. Frontiers in Psychology. 5, (2014).
Schindler, Sebastian, Wegrzyn, Martin, Steppacher, Inga, and Kißler, Johanna. “It's all in your head - how anticipating evaluation affects the processing of emotional trait adjectives”. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (2014).
Main File(s)
Access Level
OA Open Access
Last Uploaded
2014-12-11 11:37:56

This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

3 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Cerebral correlates of faking: evidence from a brief implicit association test on doping attitudes.
Schindler S, Wolff W, Kissler JM, Brand R., Front Behav Neurosci 9(), 2015
PMID: 26074798

64 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Time course and task dependence of emotion effects in word processing.
Schacht A, Sommer W., Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 9(1), 2009
PMID: 19246325
The selective processing of briefly presented affective pictures: an ERP analysis.
Schupp HT, Junghofer M, Weike AI, Hamm AO., Psychophysiology 41(3), 2004
PMID: 15102130
Interoceptive inference, emotion, and the embodied self.
Seth AK., Trends Cogn. Sci. (Regul. Ed.) 17(11), 2013
PMID: 24126130
Effects of social context on feedback-related activity in the human ventral striatum.
Simon D, Becker MP, Mothes-Lasch M, Miltner WH, Straube T., Neuroimage 99(), 2014
PMID: 24904991
Anterior cingulate cortex responds differentially to expectancy violation and social rejection.
Somerville LH, Heatherton TF, Kelley WM., Nat. Neurosci. 9(8), 2006
PMID: 16819523
Self-esteem modulates medial prefrontal cortical responses to evaluative social feedback.
Somerville LH, Kelley WM, Heatherton TF., Cereb. Cortex 20(12), 2010
PMID: 20351022
“Measuring anxiety and anger with the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) and the state-trait anger expression inventory (STAXI)” in
Spielberger C., Sydeman S., Owen A., Marsh B.., 1999
The visual N1 component as an index of a discrimination process.
Vogel EK, Luck SJ., Psychophysiology 37(2), 2000
PMID: 10731769
Seeing yourself in a positive light: brain correlates of the self-positivity bias.
Watson LA, Dritschel B, Obonsawin MC, Jentzsch I., Brain Res. 1152(), 2007
PMID: 17462610
Don't look at me in anger! Enhanced processing of angry faces in anticipation of public speaking.
Wieser MJ, Pauli P, Reicherts P, Muhlberger A., Psychophysiology 47(2), 2010
PMID: 20030758
The human amygdala and the emotional evaluation of sensory stimuli.
Zald DH., Brain Res. Brain Res. Rev. 41(1), 2003
PMID: 12505650

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 25426095
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar