Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women

Everett J, Schellhaas F, Earp B, Ando V, Memarzia J, Parise C, Fell B, Hewstone M (2015)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology 45(2): 90-104.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
Given the prominence of Muslim veils—in particular the hijab and full-face veil—in public discourse concerning the place of Muslims in Western society, we examined their impact on non-Muslims’ responses at both explicit and implicit levels. Results revealed that responses were more negative toward any veil compared with no veil, and more negative toward the full-face veil relative to the hijab: for emotions felt toward veiled women (Study 1), for non-affective attitudinal responses (Study 2), and for implicit negative attitudes revealed through response latency measures (Studies 3a and 3b). Finally, we manipulated the perceived reasons for wearing a veil, finding that exposure to positive reasons for wearing a veil led to better predicted and imagined contact (Study 4). Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.
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Everett J, Schellhaas F, Earp B, et al. Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women. Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 2015;45(2):90-104.
Everett, J., Schellhaas, F., Earp, B., Ando, V., Memarzia, J., Parise, C., Fell, B., et al. (2015). Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 45(2), 90-104.
Everett, J., Schellhaas, F., Earp, B., Ando, V., Memarzia, J., Parise, C., Fell, B., and Hewstone, M. (2015). Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 45, 90-104.
Everett, J., et al., 2015. Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 45(2), p 90-104.
J. Everett, et al., “Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women”, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, vol. 45, 2015, pp. 90-104.
Everett, J., Schellhaas, F., Earp, B., Ando, V., Memarzia, J., Parise, C., Fell, B., Hewstone, M.: Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women. Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 45, 90-104 (2015).
Everett, Jim, Schellhaas, Fabian, Earp, Brian, Ando, Victoria, Memarzia, Jessica, Parise, Cesare, Fell, Benjamin, and Hewstone, Miles. “Covered in stigma? The impact of differing levels of Islamic head-covering on explicit and implicit biases toward Muslim women”. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 45.2 (2015): 90-104.
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