Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli

Weiß K, Hilkenmeier F, Scharlau I (2013)
PLoS ONE 8(1).

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ;
Abstract
Why are nearly simultaneous stimuli frequently perceived in reversed order? The origin of errors in temporal judgments is a question older than experimental psychology itself. One of the earliest suspects is attention. According to the concept of prior entry, attention accelerates attended stimuli; thus they have "prior entry" to perceptive processing stages, including consciousness. Although latency advantages for attended stimuli have been revealed in psychophysical studies many times, these measures (e.g. temporal order judgments, simultaneity judgments) cannot test the prior-entry hypothesis completely. Since they assess latency differences between an attended and an unattended stimulus, they cannot distinguish between faster processing of attended stimuli and slower processing of unattended stimuli. Therefore, we present a novel paradigm providing separate estimates for processing advantages respectively disadvantages of attended and unattended stimuli. We found that deceleration of unattended stimuli contributes more strongly to the prior-entry illusion than acceleration of attended stimuli. Thus, in the temporal domain, attention fulfills its selective function primarily by deceleration of unattended stimuli. That means it is actually posterior entry, not prior entry which accounts for the largest part of the effect.
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Weiß K, Hilkenmeier F, Scharlau I. Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(1).
Weiß, K., Hilkenmeier, F., & Scharlau, I. (2013). Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli. PLoS ONE, 8(1).
Weiß, K., Hilkenmeier, F., and Scharlau, I. (2013). Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli. PLoS ONE 8.
Weiß, K., Hilkenmeier, F., & Scharlau, I., 2013. Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli. PLoS ONE, 8(1).
K. Weiß, F. Hilkenmeier, and I. Scharlau, “Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli”, PLoS ONE, vol. 8, 2013.
Weiß, K., Hilkenmeier, F., Scharlau, I.: Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli. PLoS ONE. 8, (2013).
Weiß, Katharina, Hilkenmeier, F., and Scharlau, Ingrid. “Attention and the speed of information processing: Posterior entry for unattended stimuli instead of prior entry for attended stimuli”. PLoS ONE 8.1 (2013).
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

1 Citation in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Structural and cognitive deficits in chronic carbon monoxide intoxication: a voxel-based morphometry study.
Chen HL, Chen PC, Lu CH, Hsu NW, Chou KH, Lin CP, Wu RW, Li SH, Cheng YF, Lin WC., BMC Neurol 13(), 2013
PMID: 24083408

5 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

The speed of visual attention: what time is it?
Carlson TA, Hogendoorn H, Verstraten FA., J Vis 6(12), 2006
PMID: 17209743
Components of visual prior entry.
Schneider KA, Bavelier D., Cogn Psychol 47(4), 2003
PMID: 14642288
Temporal preparation decreases perceptual latency: evidence from a clock paradigm.
Seifried T, Ulrich R, Bausenhart KM, Rolke B, Osman A., Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) 63(12), 2010
PMID: 20544563

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 23382884
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar