Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment

Fridrici C, Driessen M, Wingenfeld K, Kremer G, Kißler J, Beblo T (2014)
Psychiatry Research 218(3): 311-318.

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This study aimed to investigate attentional and memory biases in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression compared to healthy controls. We assumed that both groups of alcohol-dependents would show attentional and memory biases for alcohol-related words. For the alcohol-dependents with depression, we additionally expected both types of biases for negative words. Alcohol-dependents without co-morbidity (Alc) and alcohol-dependents with major depression (D-Alc) as well as control participants with a moderate consumption of alcohol (Con) completed an alcohol Stroop task and a directed forgetting paradigm using word stimuli from three categories: neutral, negative, and alcohol-related. Stroop effects showed that not only alcohol-dependents but also control participants were more distracted by alcohol-related than by negative words. In the directed forgetting procedure, all participants showed a significant effect for each word-category, including alcohol-related and negative words. The D-Alc-group memorized more alcohol-related than negative to-be-remembered words. The results do not corroborate the hypothesis of more pronounced attentional and memory biases in alcohol-dependents. However, in alcohol-dependents with depression a memory bias for alcohol-related material was found, suggesting that this group may be more pre-occupied with alcohol than patients without such co-morbidity. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Fridrici C, Driessen M, Wingenfeld K, Kremer G, Kißler J, Beblo T. Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment. Psychiatry Research. 2014;218(3):311-318.
Fridrici, C., Driessen, M., Wingenfeld, K., Kremer, G., Kißler, J., & Beblo, T. (2014). Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment. Psychiatry Research, 218(3), 311-318.
Fridrici, C., Driessen, M., Wingenfeld, K., Kremer, G., Kißler, J., and Beblo, T. (2014). Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment. Psychiatry Research 218, 311-318.
Fridrici, C., et al., 2014. Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment. Psychiatry Research, 218(3), p 311-318.
C. Fridrici, et al., “Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment”, Psychiatry Research, vol. 218, 2014, pp. 311-318.
Fridrici, C., Driessen, M., Wingenfeld, K., Kremer, G., Kißler, J., Beblo, T.: Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment. Psychiatry Research. 218, 311-318 (2014).
Fridrici, Christina, Driessen, Martin, Wingenfeld, Katja, Kremer, Georg, Kißler, Johanna, and Beblo, Thomas. “Investigating biases of attention and memory for alcohol-related and negative words in alcohol-dependents with and without major depression after day-clinic treatment”. Psychiatry Research 218.3 (2014): 311-318.
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Emotional reactions to alcohol-related words: Differences between low- and high-risk drinkers.
Gantiva C, Delgado R, Romo-Gonzalez T., Addict Behav 50(), 2015
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