Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits

Querengässer J, Schindler S (2014)
BMC Psychology 2(1).

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Journal Article | Published | English
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Background The Big Five are seen as stable personality traits. This study hypothesized that their measurement via self-ratings is differentially biased by participants’ emotions. The relationship between habitual emotions and personality should be mirrored in a patterned influence of emotional states upon personality scores. Methods We experimentally induced emotional states and compared baseline Big Five scores of ninety-eight German participants (67 female; mean age 22.2) to their scores after the induction of happiness or sadness. Manipulation checks included the induced emotion’s intensity and durability. Results The expected differential effect could be detected for neuroticism and extraversion and as a trend for agreeableness. Post-hoc analyses showed that only sadness led to increased neuroticism and decreased extraversion scores. Oppositely, happiness did not decrease neuroticism, but there was a trend for an elevation on extraversion scores. Conclusion Results suggest a specific effect of sadness on self-reported personality traits, particularly on neuroticism. Sadness may trigger different self-concepts in susceptible people, biasing perceived personality. This bias could be minimised by tracking participants’ emotional states prior to personality measurement.
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Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
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Querengässer J, Schindler S. Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits. BMC Psychology. 2014;2(1).
Querengässer, J., & Schindler, S. (2014). Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits. BMC Psychology, 2(1).
Querengässer, J., and Schindler, S. (2014). Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits. BMC Psychology 2.
Querengässer, J., & Schindler, S., 2014. Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits. BMC Psychology, 2(1).
J. Querengässer and S. Schindler, “Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits”, BMC Psychology, vol. 2, 2014.
Querengässer, J., Schindler, S.: Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits. BMC Psychology. 2, (2014).
Querengässer, Jan, and Schindler, Sebastian. “Sad but true? - How induced emotional states differentially bias self-rated Big Five personality traits”. BMC Psychology 2.1 (2014).
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