Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA)

Selvamani RSV, Telaar M, Friehs K, Flaschel E (2014)
Microbial Cell Factories 13.

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Background: Segregational stability of plasmids is of major concern for recombinant bacterial production strains. One of the best strategies to counteract plasmid loss is the use of auxotrophic mutants which are complemented with the lacking gene along with the product-relevant ones. However, these knockout mutants often show unwanted growth in complex standard media or no growth at all under uncomplemented conditions. This led to the choice of a gene for knockout that only connects two essential arms of an essential metabolic pathway - the glycolysis. Results: Triosephosphate isomerase was chosen because its knockout will have a tremendous effect on growth on glucose as well as on glycerol. On glycerol the effect is almost absolute whereas on glucose growth is still possible, but with considerably lower rate than usual. This feature is essential because it may render cloning easier. This enzymatic activity was successfully tested as an alternative to antibiotic-based plasmid selection. Expression of a model recombinant beta-glucanase in continuous cultivation was possible with stable maintenance of the plasmid. In addition, the complementation of tpiA knockout strains by the corresponding plasmids and their growth characteristics were tested on a series of complex and synthetic media. The accumulation of methylglyoxal during the growth of tpiA-deficient strains was shown to be a possible cause for the growth disadvantage of these strains in comparison to the parent strain for the Keio Collection strain or the complemented knock-out strain. Conclusion: Through the use of this new auxotrophic complementation system, antibiotic-free cloning and selection of recombinant plasmid were possible. Continuous cultivation and recombinant protein expression with high segregational stability over an extended time period was also demonstrated.
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Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
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Selvamani RSV, Telaar M, Friehs K, Flaschel E. Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA). Microbial Cell Factories. 2014;13.
Selvamani, R. S. V., Telaar, M., Friehs, K., & Flaschel, E. (2014). Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA). Microbial Cell Factories, 13.
Selvamani, R. S. V., Telaar, M., Friehs, K., and Flaschel, E. (2014). Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA). Microbial Cell Factories 13.
Selvamani, R.S.V., et al., 2014. Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA). Microbial Cell Factories, 13.
R.S.V. Selvamani, et al., “Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA)”, Microbial Cell Factories, vol. 13, 2014.
Selvamani, R.S.V., Telaar, M., Friehs, K., Flaschel, E.: Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA). Microbial Cell Factories. 13, (2014).
Selvamani, Ram Shankar Velur, Telaar, Maurice, Friehs, Karl, and Flaschel, Erwin. “Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA)”. Microbial Cell Factories 13 (2014).
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