Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study

Cacciari C, Bolognini N, Senna I, Pellicciari MC, Miniussi C, Papagno C (2011)
Brain and Language 119(3): 149-157.

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Cacciari C, Bolognini N, Senna I, Pellicciari MC, Miniussi C, Papagno C. Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study. Brain and Language. 2011;119(3):149-157.
Cacciari, C., Bolognini, N., Senna, I., Pellicciari, M. C., Miniussi, C., & Papagno, C. (2011). Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study. Brain and Language, 119(3), 149-157. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2011.05.004
Cacciari, C., Bolognini, N., Senna, I., Pellicciari, M. C., Miniussi, C., and Papagno, C. (2011). Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study. Brain and Language 119, 149-157.
Cacciari, C., et al., 2011. Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study. Brain and Language, 119(3), p 149-157.
C. Cacciari, et al., “Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study”, Brain and Language, vol. 119, 2011, pp. 149-157.
Cacciari, C., Bolognini, N., Senna, I., Pellicciari, M.C., Miniussi, C., Papagno, C.: Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study. Brain and Language. 119, 149-157 (2011).
Cacciari, C., Bolognini, N., Senna, Irene, Pellicciari, M.C., Miniussi, C., and Papagno, C. “Literal, fictive and metaphorical motion sentences preserve the motion component of the verb: A TMS study”. Brain and Language 119.3 (2011): 149-157.
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