The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders

Werner N-S, Kühnel S, Markowitsch HJ (2013)
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7.

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Journal Article | Published | English
Abstract
Humans are experts in face perception. We are better able to distinguish between the differences of faces and their components than between any other kind of objects. Several studies investigating the underlying neural networks provided evidence for deviated face processing in criminal individuals, although results are often confounded by accompanying mental or addiction disorders. On the other hand, face processing in non-criminal healthy persons can be of high juridical interest in cases of witnessing a felony and afterward identifying a culprit. Memory and therefore recognition of a person can be affected by many parameters and thus become distorted. But also face processing itself is modulated by different factors like facial characteristics, degree of familiarity, and emotional relation. These factors make the comparison of different cases, as well as the transfer of laboratory results to real live settings very challenging. Several neuroimaging studies have been published in recent years and some progress was made connecting certain brain activation patterns with the correct recognition of an individual. However, there is still a long way to go before brain imaging can make a reliable contribution to court procedures.
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Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
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Werner N-S, Kühnel S, Markowitsch HJ. The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. 2013;7.
Werner, N. - S., Kühnel, S., & Markowitsch, H. J. (2013). The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 7.
Werner, N. - S., Kühnel, S., and Markowitsch, H. J. (2013). The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7.
Werner, N.-S., Kühnel, S., & Markowitsch, H.J., 2013. The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 7.
N.-S. Werner, S. Kühnel, and H.J. Markowitsch, “The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders”, Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, vol. 7, 2013.
Werner, N.-S., Kühnel, S., Markowitsch, H.J.: The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. 7, (2013).
Werner, Nicole-Simone, Kühnel, Sina, and Markowitsch, Hans J. “The neuroscience of face processing and identification in eyewitnesses and offenders”. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7 (2013).
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