Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae

Müller C, Agerbirk N, Olsen CE, Boevé J-L, Schaffner U, Brakefield PM (2001)
Journal of Chemical Ecology 27(12): 2505-2516.

Journal Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ; ; ; ;
Abstract
Interactions between insects and glucosinolate-containing plant species have been investigated for a long time. Although the glucosinolate–myrosinase system is believed to act as a defense mechanism against generalist herbivores and fungi, several specialist insects use these secondary metabolites for host plant finding and acceptance and can handle them physiologically. However, sequestration of glucosinolates in specialist herbivores has been less well studied. Larvae of the turnip sawfly Athalia rosae feed on several glucosinolate-containing plant species. When larvae are disturbed by antagonists, they release one or more small droplets of hemolymph from their integument. This “reflex bleeding” is used as a defense mechanism. Specific glucosinolate analysis, by conversion to desulfoglucosinolates and analysis of these by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, revealed that larvae incorporate and concentrate the plant's characteristic glucosinolates from their hosts. Extracts of larvae that were reared on Sinapis alba contained sinalbin, even when the larvae were first starved for 22 hr and, thus, had empty guts. Hemolymph was analyzed from larvae that were reared on either S. alba, Brassica nigra, or Barbarea stricta. Leaves were analyzed from the same plants the larvae had fed on. Sinalbin (from S. alba), sinigrin (B. nigra), or glucobarbarin and glucobrassicin (B. stricta) were present in leaves in concentrations less than 1 μmol/g fresh weight, while the same glucosinolates could be detected in the larvae's hemolymph in concentrations between 10 and 31 μmol/g fresh weight, except that glucobrassicin was present only as a trace. In larval feces, only trace amounts of glucosinolates (sinalbin and sinigrin) could be detected. The glucosinolates were likewise found in freshly emerged adults, showing that the sequestered phytochemicals were transferred through the pupal stage.
Publishing Year
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Müller C, Agerbirk N, Olsen CE, Boevé J-L, Schaffner U, Brakefield PM. Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae. Journal of Chemical Ecology. 2001;27(12):2505-2516.
Müller, C., Agerbirk, N., Olsen, C. E., Boevé, J. - L., Schaffner, U., & Brakefield, P. M. (2001). Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 27(12), 2505-2516.
Müller, C., Agerbirk, N., Olsen, C. E., Boevé, J. - L., Schaffner, U., and Brakefield, P. M. (2001). Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae. Journal of Chemical Ecology 27, 2505-2516.
Müller, C., et al., 2001. Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 27(12), p 2505-2516.
C. Müller, et al., “Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae”, Journal of Chemical Ecology, vol. 27, 2001, pp. 2505-2516.
Müller, C., Agerbirk, N., Olsen, C.E., Boevé, J.-L., Schaffner, U., Brakefield, P.M.: Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae. Journal of Chemical Ecology. 27, 2505-2516 (2001).
Müller, Caroline, Agerbirk, Niels, Olsen, Carl Erik, Boevé, Jean-Luc, Schaffner, Urs, and Brakefield, Paul M. “Sequestration of host plant glucosinolates in the defensive hemolymph of the sawfly Athalia rosae”. Journal of Chemical Ecology 27.12 (2001): 2505-2516.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

46 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Taste detection of the non-volatile isothiocyanate moringin results in deterrence to glucosinolate-adapted insect larvae.
Muller C, van Loon J, Ruschioni S, De Nicola GR, Olsen CE, Iori R, Agerbirk N., Phytochemistry 118(), 2015
PMID: 26318325
Glycoalkaloids of wild and cultivated Solanum: effects on specialist and generalist insect herbivores.
Altesor P, Garcia A, Font E, Rodriguez-Haralambides A, Vilaro F, Oesterheld M, Soler R, Gonzalez A., J. Chem. Ecol. 40(6), 2014
PMID: 24863489
Invertebrate and avian predators as drivers of chemical defensive strategies in tenthredinid sawflies.
Boeve JL, Blank SM, Meijer G, Nyman T., BMC Evol. Biol. 13(), 2013
PMID: 24041372
Flavonoid metabolites in the hemolymph of European pine sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) larvae.
Vihakas M, Tahtinen P, Ossipov V, Salminen JP., J. Chem. Ecol. 38(5), 2012
PMID: 22527054
Host shifts from Lamiales to Brassicaceae in the sawfly genus Athalia.
Opitz SE, Boeve JL, Nagy ZT, Sonet G, Koch F, Muller C., PLoS ONE 7(4), 2012
PMID: 22485146
Chemically mediated tritrophic interactions: opposing effects of glucosinolates on a specialist herbivore and its predators
Chaplin-Kramer R, Kliebenstein DJ, Chiem A, Morrill E, Mills NJ, Kremen C., 2011
PMID: IND44600081
Prey-mediated effects of glucosinolates on aphid predators
KOS M, KABOUW P, NOORDAM R, HENDRIKS K, VET LEM, VAN LOON JJA, DICKE M., Ecol Entomol 36(3), 2011
PMID: IND44577811
Growth and reproductive costs of larval defence in the aposematic lepidopteran Pieris brassicae.
Higginson AD, Delf J, Ruxton GD, Speed MP., J Anim Ecol 80(2), 2011
PMID: 21155771
New types of flavonol oligoglycosides accumulate in the hemolymph of birch-feeding sawfly larvae.
Vihakas MA, Kapari L, Salminen JP., J. Chem. Ecol. 36(8), 2010
PMID: 20589418
Presence of haemocyte-like cells in coccinellid reflex blood.
Karystinou A, Thomas APM, Roy HE., Physiol. Entomol. 29(1), 2004
PMID: IND43629525

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 11789955
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar