Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering

Schindler S, Kißler J, Kühl K-P, Hellweg R, Bengner T (2013)
BMC Psychology 1(1): 12.

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Background Detection of feigned neurocognitive deficits is a challenge for neuropsychological assessment. We conducted two studies to examine whether memory malingering is characterized by an elevated proportion of false negatives during yes/no recognition testing and whether this could be a useful measure for assessment. Methods Study 1 examined 51 participants claiming compensation due to mental disorders, 51 patients with affective disorders not claiming compensation and 13 patients with established dementia. Claimants were sub-divided into suspected malingerers (n = 11) and non-malingerers (n = 40) according to the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM). In study 2, non-clinical participants were instructed to either malinger memory deficits due to depression (n = 20), or to perform normally (n = 20). Results In study 1, suspected malingerers had more false negative responses on the recognition test than all other groups and false negative responding was correlated with Minnesota-Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) measures of deception. In study 2, using a cut-off score derived from the clinical study, the number of false negative responses on the yes/no recognition test predicted group membership with comparable accuracy as the TOMM, combining both measures yielded the best classification. Upon interview, participants suspected the TOMM more often as a malingering test than the yes/no recognition test. Conclusion Results indicate that many malingers adopt a strategy of exaggerated false negative responding on a yes/no recognition memory test. This differentiates them from both dementia and affective disorder, recommending false negative responses as an efficient and inconspicuous screening measure of memory malingering.
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Schindler S, Kißler J, Kühl K-P, Hellweg R, Bengner T. Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology. 2013;1(1):12.
Schindler, S., Kißler, J., Kühl, K. - P., Hellweg, R., & Bengner, T. (2013). Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology, 1(1), 12. doi:10.1186/2050-7283-1-12
Schindler, S., Kißler, J., Kühl, K. - P., Hellweg, R., and Bengner, T. (2013). Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology 1, 12.
Schindler, S., et al., 2013. Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology, 1(1), p 12.
S. Schindler, et al., “Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering”, BMC Psychology, vol. 1, 2013, pp. 12.
Schindler, S., Kißler, J., Kühl, K.-P., Hellweg, R., Bengner, T.: Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology. 1, 12 (2013).
Schindler, Sebastian, Kißler, Johanna, Kühl, Klaus-Peter, Hellweg, Rainer, and Bengner, Thomas. “Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering”. BMC Psychology 1.1 (2013): 12.
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