Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering

Schindler S, Kißler J, Kühl K-P, Hellweg R, Bengner T (2013)
BMC Psychology 1(1).

Download
OA
Journal Article | Published | English
Author
; ; ; ;
Abstract
Background Detection of feigned neurocognitive deficits is a challenge for neuropsychological assessment. We conducted two studies to examine whether memory malingering is characterized by an elevated proportion of false negatives during yes/no recognition testing and whether this could be a useful measure for assessment. Methods Study 1 examined 51 participants claiming compensation due to mental disorders, 51 patients with affective disorders not claiming compensation and 13 patients with established dementia. Claimants were sub-divided into suspected malingerers (n = 11) and non-malingerers (n = 40) according to the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM). In study 2, non-clinical participants were instructed to either malinger memory deficits due to depression (n = 20), or to perform normally (n = 20). Results In study 1, suspected malingerers had more false negative responses on the recognition test than all other groups and false negative responding was correlated with Minnesota-Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) measures of deception. In study 2, using a cut-off score derived from the clinical study, the number of false negative responses on the yes/no recognition test predicted group membership with comparable accuracy as the TOMM, combining both measures yielded the best classification. Upon interview, participants suspected the TOMM more often as a malingering test than the yes/no recognition test. Conclusion Results indicate that many malingers adopt a strategy of exaggerated false negative responding on a yes/no recognition memory test. This differentiates them from both dementia and affective disorder, recommending false negative responses as an efficient and inconspicuous screening measure of memory malingering.
Publishing Year
ISSN
Financial disclosure
Article Processing Charge funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Open Access Publication Fund of Bielefeld University.
PUB-ID

Cite this

Schindler S, Kißler J, Kühl K-P, Hellweg R, Bengner T. Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology. 2013;1(1).
Schindler, S., Kißler, J., Kühl, K. - P., Hellweg, R., & Bengner, T. (2013). Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology, 1(1).
Schindler, S., Kißler, J., Kühl, K. - P., Hellweg, R., and Bengner, T. (2013). Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology 1.
Schindler, S., et al., 2013. Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology, 1(1).
S. Schindler, et al., “Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering”, BMC Psychology, vol. 1, 2013.
Schindler, S., Kißler, J., Kühl, K.-P., Hellweg, R., Bengner, T.: Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering. BMC Psychology. 1, (2013).
Schindler, Sebastian, Kißler, Johanna, Kühl, Klaus-Peter, Hellweg, Rainer, and Bengner, Thomas. “Using the yes/no recognition response pattern to detect memory malingering”. BMC Psychology 1.1 (2013).
Main File(s)
Access Level
OA Open Access
Last Uploaded
2013-07-18 15:35:02

This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

52 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Post-Daubert admissibility of scientific evidence on malingering of cognitive deficits.
Vallabhajosula B, van Gorp WG., J. Am. Acad. Psychiatry Law 29(2), 2001
PMID: 11471788
Biased recognition of positive faces in aging and amnestic mild cognitive impairment.
Werheid K, Gruno M, Kathmann N, Fischer H, Almkvist O, Winblad B., Psychol Aging 25(1), 2010
PMID: 20230123

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Sources

PMID: 25566364
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar