The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents

Fridrici C, Leichsenring-Driessen C, Driessen M, Wingenfeld K, Kremer G, Beblo T (2013)
Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors 27(1): 62-70.

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This study aimed to investigate attentional bias in alcohol-dependent patients and control participants with regard to individualized (specific) and nonindividualized (general) alcohol-related words. First, it was assumed that alcohol-dependents rather than control participants are more distracted by alcohol-related words, particularly individualized alcohol-related words, than by non-alcohol-related words. Second, words which are derived from participants' individual drinking experiences were assumed to induce the highest Stroop interference over all participants. Alcohol-dependent patients (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV, n = 39) and healthy control participants with a moderate consume of alcohol (n = 33) completed a modified alcohol Stoop task based on word stimuli derived from four categories: neutral versus negative and specific versus general alcohol-related words. While alcohol-dependents showed similar RTs in the different word categories, control participants showed the slowest reactions after presentation of specific alcohol-related words. Generally, alcohol-dependents had slower RTs than controls did. The results do not corroborate the hypothesis of increased interference caused by specific alcohol-related words in alcohol-dependents instead, this presumption seems to apply to the control participants only. As we did not find any special impact of personally relevant alcohol-related words outclassing the influence of preselected alcohol-related words in the patient group, the benefit of individualized stimuli should be reconsidered. Our results do not support the relevance of attentional retraining programs.
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Fridrici C, Leichsenring-Driessen C, Driessen M, Wingenfeld K, Kremer G, Beblo T. The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors. 2013;27(1):62-70.
Fridrici, C., Leichsenring-Driessen, C., Driessen, M., Wingenfeld, K., Kremer, G., & Beblo, T. (2013). The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors, 27(1), 62-70.
Fridrici, C., Leichsenring-Driessen, C., Driessen, M., Wingenfeld, K., Kremer, G., and Beblo, T. (2013). The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors 27, 62-70.
Fridrici, C., et al., 2013. The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors, 27(1), p 62-70.
C. Fridrici, et al., “The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents”, Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 27, 2013, pp. 62-70.
Fridrici, C., Leichsenring-Driessen, C., Driessen, M., Wingenfeld, K., Kremer, G., Beblo, T.: The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors. 27, 62-70 (2013).
Fridrici, Christina, Leichsenring-Driessen, Carmen, Driessen, Martin, Wingenfeld, Katja, Kremer, Georg, and Beblo, Thomas. “The Individualized Alcohol Stroop Task: No Attentional Bias Toward Personalized Stimuli in Alcohol-Dependents”. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors 27.1 (2013): 62-70.
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Individualised but not general alcohol Stroop predicts alcohol use.
Christiansen P, Bloor JF., Drug Alcohol Depend 134(), 2014
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