Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task

Seegelke C, Hughes C, Schütz C, Schack T (2012)
Experimental Brain Research 222(1-2): 125-136.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
Research has demonstrated that people will adopt initially awkward grasps if they afford more comfortable postures at the end of the movement. This end-state comfort effect provides evidence that humans represent future posture states and select appropriate grasps in anticipation of these postures. The purpose of the study was to examine to what extent the final action goal of a task influences motor planning of preceding segments, and whether grasp postures are planned to optimize end-state comfort during a three-segment action sequence in which two objects are manipulated, and participants can select from a continuous range of possible grasp postures. In the current experiment, participants opened a drawer, grasped an object from inside the drawer, and placed it on a table in one of the three target orientations (0A degrees, 90A degrees, or 180A degrees object rotation required). Grasp postures during the initial movement segment (drawer opening) were not influenced by the final action goal (i.e., required target orientation). In contrast, both the intermediate (i.e., object grasping) and the final movement segment (i.e., object placing) were influenced by target orientation. In addition, participants adopted different strategies to achieve the action goal when the object required 180A degrees rotation, with 42 % of participants prioritizing intermediate-state comfort and 58 % prioritizing end-state comfort. The results indicate that individuals optimize task performance by selecting lower level constraints that allow for successful completion of the action goal and that the selection of these constraints is dependent upon contextual, environmental, and internal influences.
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Seegelke C, Hughes C, Schütz C, Schack T. Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research. 2012;222(1-2):125-136.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C., Schütz, C., & Schack, T. (2012). Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research, 222(1-2), 125-136.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C., Schütz, C., and Schack, T. (2012). Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research 222, 125-136.
Seegelke, C., et al., 2012. Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research, 222(1-2), p 125-136.
C. Seegelke, et al., “Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task”, Experimental Brain Research, vol. 222, 2012, pp. 125-136.
Seegelke, C., Hughes, C., Schütz, C., Schack, T.: Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task. Experimental Brain Research. 222, 125-136 (2012).
Seegelke, Christian, Hughes, Charmayne, Schütz, Christoph, and Schack, Thomas. “Individual differences in motor planning during a multi-segment object manipulation task”. Experimental Brain Research 222.1-2 (2012): 125-136.
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