Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words

Magyari L, de Ruiter J (2012)
Front. Psychology 3: 376.

Download
No fulltext has been uploaded. References only!
Journal Article | Original Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
;
Abstract / Notes
During conversation listeners have to perform several tasks simultaneously. They have to comprehend their interlocutor’s turn, while also having to prepare their own next turn. Moreover, a careful analysis of the timing of natural conversation reveals that next speakers also time their turns very precisely. This is possible only if listeners can predict accurately when the speaker’s turn is going to end. But how are people able to predict when a turn-ends? We propose that people know when a turn-ends, because they know how it ends. We conducted a gating study to examine if better turn-end predictions coincide with more accurate anticipation of the last words of a turn. We used turns from an earlier button-press experiment where people had to press a button exactly when a turn-ended. We show that the proportion of correct guesses in our experiment is higher when a turn’s end was estimated better in time in the button-press experiment. When people were too late in their anticipation in the button-press experiment, they also anticipated more words in our gating study. We conclude that people made predictions in advance about the upcoming content of a turn and used this prediction to estimate the duration of the turn. We suggest an economical model of turn-end anticipation that is based on anticipation of words and syntactic frames in comprehension.
Publishing Year
ISSN
eISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Magyari L, de Ruiter J. Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words. Front. Psychology. 2012;3:376.
Magyari, L., & de Ruiter, J. (2012). Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words. Front. Psychology, 3, 376. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00376
Magyari, L., and de Ruiter, J. (2012). Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words. Front. Psychology 3, 376.
Magyari, L., & de Ruiter, J., 2012. Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words. Front. Psychology, 3, p 376.
L. Magyari and J. de Ruiter, “Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words”, Front. Psychology, vol. 3, 2012, pp. 376.
Magyari, L., de Ruiter, J.: Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words. Front. Psychology. 3, 376 (2012).
Magyari, L., and de Ruiter, Jan. “Prediction of turn-ends based on anticipation of upcoming words”. Front. Psychology 3 (2012): 376.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:

25 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Knowing when to respond: the role of visual information in conversational turn exchanges.
Latif N, Alsius A, Munhall KG., Atten Percept Psychophys 80(1), 2018
PMID: 29080047
Oscillatory Brain Responses Reflect Anticipation during Comprehension of Speech Acts in Spoken Dialog.
Gisladottir RS, Bögels S, Levinson SC., Front Hum Neurosci 12(), 2018
PMID: 29467635
Temporal Preparation for Speaking in Question-Answer Sequences.
Magyari L, De Ruiter JP, Levinson SC., Front Psychol 8(), 2017
PMID: 28270782
You cannot speak and listen at the same time: a probabilistic model of turn-taking.
Donnarumma F, Dindo H, Iodice P, Pezzulo G., Biol Cybern 111(2), 2017
PMID: 28265753
Processing language in face-to-face conversation: Questions with gestures get faster responses.
Holler J, Kendrick KH, Levinson SC., Psychon Bull Rev (), 2017
PMID: 28887798
What do we mean by prediction in language comprehension?
Kuperberg GR, Jaeger TF., Lang Cogn Neurosci 31(1), 2016
PMID: 27135040
Eye Gaze Behavior at Turn Transition: How Aphasic Patients Process Speakers' Turns during Video Observation.
Preisig BC, Eggenberger N, Zito G, Vanbellingen T, Schumacher R, Hopfner S, Gutbrod K, Nyffeler T, Cazzoli D, Annoni JM, Bohlhalter S, Müri RM., J Cogn Neurosci 28(10), 2016
PMID: 27243612
Anticipation in turn-taking: mechanisms and information sources.
Riest C, Jorschick AB, de Ruiter JP., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 25699004
Breathing for answering: the time course of response planning in conversation.
Torreira F, Bögels S, Levinson SC., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 25814976
Turn-timing in signed conversations: coordinating stroke-to-stroke turn boundaries.
de Vos C, Torreira F, Levinson SC., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 25852593
Dutch and English toddlers' use of linguistic cues in predicting upcoming turn transitions.
Lammertink I, Casillas M, Benders T, Post B, Fikkert P., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 25964772
The effects of processing and sequence organization on the timing of turn taking: a corpus study.
Roberts SG, Torreira F, Levinson SC., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 26029125
The use of content and timing to predict turn transitions.
Garrod S, Pickering MJ., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 26124728
Timing in turn-taking and its implications for processing models of language.
Levinson SC, Torreira F., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 26124727
Early development of turn-taking in vocal interaction between mothers and infants.
Gratier M, Devouche E, Guellai B, Infanti R, Yilmaz E, Parlato-Oliveira E., Front Psychol 6(), 2015
PMID: 26388790
Withholding planned speech is reflected in synchronized beta-band oscillations.
Piai V, Roelofs A, Rommers J, Dahlslätt K, Maris E., Front Hum Neurosci 9(), 2015
PMID: 26528164
Using the readiness potential of button-press and verbal response within spoken language processing.
Jansen S, Wesselmeier H, de Ruiter JP, Mueller HM., J Neurosci Methods 232(), 2014
PMID: 24809245
Influences of semantic and syntactic incongruence on readiness potential in turn-end anticipation.
Wesselmeier H, Jansen S, Müller HM., Front Hum Neurosci 8(), 2014
PMID: 24904349
Early anticipation lies behind the speed of response in conversation.
Magyari L, Bastiaansen MC, de Ruiter JP, Levinson SC., J Cogn Neurosci 26(11), 2014
PMID: 24893743
The origin of human multi-modal communication.
Levinson SC, Holler J., Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 369(1651), 2014
PMID: 25092670
Perception of conversations: the importance of semantics and intonation in children's development.
Keitel A, Prinz W, Friederici AD, von Hofsten C, Daum MM., J Exp Child Psychol 116(2), 2013
PMID: 23876388

5 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

On the ability to inhibit thought and action: general and special theories of an act of control.
Logan GD, Van Zandt T, Verbruggen F, Wagenmakers EJ., Psychol Rev 121(1), 2014
PMID: 24490789
Universals and cultural variation in turn-taking in conversation.
Stivers T, Enfield NJ, Brown P, Englert C, Hayashi M, Heinemann T, Hoymann G, Rossano F, de Ruiter JP, Yoon KE, Levinson SC., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106(26), 2009
PMID: 19553212

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 23112776
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar