Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players

Stoeckel T, Weigelt M (2012)
Journal of Sports Sciences 30(10): 1037-1045.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
Athletes frequently have to adapt their skills to fast changes of play, often requiring the flexible execution of a particular movement skill with either hand. To assess the influence of sport-specific expertise and extensive sport training on human laterality, a video analysis of regular basketball games was performed for professional, semi-professional, and amateur players to investigate how non-dominant hand use and proficiency change with increasing expertise. Our results showed that the right-hand ( i. e. dominant hand) bias in basketball players is reduced with increasing expertise ( i. e. competitive level). Accordingly, we found that professional players use their non-dominant hand more often and with greater success than semiprofessional and amateur players. This was true for most of the basketball-specific skills. Based on these results, we assume that increasing amounts of bilateral practice can lead to a shift in task-specific manual preference towards a higher use of both hands in competition, as well as to a higher proficiency for non-dominant hand actions in particular. From an applied perspective, the more frequent use and higher proficiency of the non-dominant hand in professional basketball players, compared with amateurs, suggests that the context-specific and skilled use of the non-dominant hand is crucial for successful play at higher competitive levels in the sport of basketball.
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Stoeckel T, Weigelt M. Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players. Journal of Sports Sciences. 2012;30(10):1037-1045.
Stoeckel, T., & Weigelt, M. (2012). Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(10), 1037-1045.
Stoeckel, T., and Weigelt, M. (2012). Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players. Journal of Sports Sciences 30, 1037-1045.
Stoeckel, T., & Weigelt, M., 2012. Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players. Journal of Sports Sciences, 30(10), p 1037-1045.
T. Stoeckel and M. Weigelt, “Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players”, Journal of Sports Sciences, vol. 30, 2012, pp. 1037-1045.
Stoeckel, T., Weigelt, M.: Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players. Journal of Sports Sciences. 30, 1037-1045 (2012).
Stoeckel, Tino, and Weigelt, Matthias. “Plasticity of human handedness: Decreased one-hand bias and inter-manual performance asymmetry in expert basketball players”. Journal of Sports Sciences 30.10 (2012): 1037-1045.
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PMID: 24724514

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