QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait

Schielzeth H, Kempenaers B, Ellegren H, Forstmeier W (2012)
Evolution 66(1): 18-30.

Download
No fulltext has been uploaded. References only!
Journal Article | Original Article | Published | English

No fulltext has been uploaded

Author
; ; ;
Abstract
Mate choice based on sexual ornaments can impose strong selection, which raises the question of how genetic variation in ornaments is maintained. One mechanism that has been proposed is genic capture. If ornament expression is influenced by general condition and condition is under polygenic control, selection will be inefficient in removing genetic variation. Here we analyze whether the genetic architecture of beak color in a population of zebra finches supports this hypothesis. Zebra finch beak color is commonly assumed to be under strong selection by mate choice, although some of the evidence is ambiguous. We show that beak redness has a heritability of 34% in our population and that it is strongly genetically correlated between the sexes, suggesting that it is largely controlled by the same genes in males and females. We mapped variation in beak redness based on 1,404 SNP markers genotyped in a large pedigree. We find evidence for linkage on four chromosomes (Tgu1, Tgu5, Tgu13, Tgu21), which together explain a large part of the additive genetic variance. Our finding of genomic regions with major additive effects is not consistent with directional selection and genic capture, but rather suggests a role of antagonistic pleiotropy in maintaining genetic variation.
Publishing Year
ISSN
PUB-ID

Cite this

Schielzeth H, Kempenaers B, Ellegren H, Forstmeier W. QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait. Evolution. 2012;66(1):18-30.
Schielzeth, H., Kempenaers, B., Ellegren, H., & Forstmeier, W. (2012). QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait. Evolution, 66(1), 18-30. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01431.x
Schielzeth, H., Kempenaers, B., Ellegren, H., and Forstmeier, W. (2012). QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait. Evolution 66, 18-30.
Schielzeth, H., et al., 2012. QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait. Evolution, 66(1), p 18-30.
H. Schielzeth, et al., “QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait”, Evolution, vol. 66, 2012, pp. 18-30.
Schielzeth, H., Kempenaers, B., Ellegren, H., Forstmeier, W.: QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait. Evolution. 66, 18-30 (2012).
Schielzeth, Holger, Kempenaers, Bart, Ellegren, Hans, and Forstmeier, Wolfgang. “QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait”. Evolution 66.1 (2012): 18-30.
This data publication is cited in the following publications:
This publication cites the following data publications:
2639503
Data from: QTL linkage mapping of zebra finch beak color shows an oligogenic control of a sexually selected trait
Schielzeth H, Kempenaers B, Ellegren H, Forstmeier W (2011) : Dryad Digital Repository. doi:10.5061/DRYAD.R044B.

26 Citations in Europe PMC

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

QTL and quantitative genetic analysis of beak morphology reveals patterns of standing genetic variation in an Estrildid finch.
Knief U, Schielzeth H, Kempenaers B, Ellegren H, Forstmeier W., Mol Ecol 21(15), 2012
PMID: 22694741

66 References

Data provided by Europe PubMed Central.

Sexual selection, selection load and quantitative genetics of zebra finch bill colour
Price, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 263(), 1996
Constraints on the evolution of attractive traits: selection in male and female zebra finches
Price, Am. Nat. 144(), 1994
The lek paradox and the capture of genetic variance by condition dependent traits
Rowe, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B 263(), 1996
Zebra finch females prefer males with redder bills independent of song rate-a meta-analysis
Simons, Behav. Ecol. 22(), 2011
A genome scan for quantitative trait loci in a wild population of red deer (Cervus elaphus)
Slate, Geneticsa 162(), 2002
Discrimination among males by female zebra finches based on past as well as current phenotype
Sullivan, Ethology 96(), 1994
A strong quantitative trait locus for wing length on chromosome 2 in a wild population of great reed warblers
Tarka, Proc. R. Soc. B 1692(), 2010
Genic capture and resolving the lek paradox.
Tomkins JL, Radwan J, Kotiaho JS, Tregenza T., Trends Ecol. Evol. (Amst.) 19(6), 2004
PMID: 16701278
Genetic linkage map of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, and quantitative trait loci analysis of male size and colour variation
Tripathi, Proc. R. Soc. B 276(), 2009
Analysis of the blind Drosophila mutant ninaB identifies the gene encoding the key enzyme for vitamin A formation invivo.
von Lintig J, Dreher A, Kiefer C, Wernet MF, Vogt K., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98(3), 2001
PMID: 11158606
The role of sexual imprinting for sex recognition in zebra finches: a difference between males and females
Vos, Anim. Behav. 50(), 1995
Candidate genes for carotenoid coloration in vertebrates and their expression profiles in the carotenoid-containing plumage and bill of a wild bird
Walsh, Proc. R. Soc. B (), 2011
The genetic architecture of a female sexual ornament.
Wright D, Kerje S, Brandstrom H, Schutz K, Kindmark A, Andersson L, Jensen P, Pizzari T., Evolution 62(1), 2008
PMID: 18053076

Export

0 Marked Publications

Open Data PUB

Web of Science

View record in Web of Science®

Sources

PMID: 22220861
PubMed | Europe PMC

Search this title in

Google Scholar