Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches

Bolund E, Schielzeth H, Forstmeier W (2012)
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 66(6): 975-984.

Journal Article | Published | English

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Abstract
Song is used as a signal in sexual selection in a wide range of taxa. In birds, males of many species continue to sing after pair formation. It has been suggested that a high song output after pair formation might serve to attract extrapair females and to minimise their own partner’s interest in extra-pair copulations. A non-exclusive alternative function that has received only scant attention is that the amount of song might stimulate the own female’s investment into eggs in a quantitative way. We address these hypotheses in a captive population of zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, by relating male undirected song output (i.e. non-courtship song) to male egg siring success and female reproductive investment in two different set-ups. When allowed to breed in aviaries, males with the highest song output were no more attractive than others to females in an analysis of 4,294 extra-pair courtships involving 164 different males, and they also did not sire more offspring (both trends were against the expectation). When breeding in cages with two different partners subsequently, females produced larger eggs with more orange yolks when paired to a male with a high song output. These findings suggest that singing activity in paired zebra finch males might primarily function to stimulate the partner and not to attract extra-pair females.
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Bolund E, Schielzeth H, Forstmeier W. Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 2012;66(6):975-984.
Bolund, E., Schielzeth, H., & Forstmeier, W. (2012). Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 66(6), 975-984.
Bolund, E., Schielzeth, H., and Forstmeier, W. (2012). Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 66, 975-984.
Bolund, E., Schielzeth, H., & Forstmeier, W., 2012. Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 66(6), p 975-984.
E. Bolund, H. Schielzeth, and W. Forstmeier, “Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches”, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, vol. 66, 2012, pp. 975-984.
Bolund, E., Schielzeth, H., Forstmeier, W.: Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 66, 975-984 (2012).
Bolund, Elisabeth, Schielzeth, Holger, and Forstmeier, Wolfgang. “Singing activity stimulates partner reproductive investment rather than increasing paternity success in zebra finches”. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 66.6 (2012): 975-984.
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