Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells

Scheibe R, Dietz K-J (2012)
Plant Cell & Environment 35(2): 202-216.

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Photosynthesis generates the energy carriers NADPH and ATP to be consumed in assimilatory processes. Continuous energy conversion and optimal use of the available light energy are only guaranteed when all reduction-oxidation (redox) processes are tightly controlled. A robust network links metabolism with regulation and signalling. Information on the redox situation is generated and transferred by various redox components that are parts of this network. Any imbalance in the network is sensed, and the information is transmitted in order to elicit a response at the various levels of regulation and in the different cellular compartments. Redox information within the chloroplast is derived from intersystem electron transport, the ferredoxin-NADP oxidoreductase (FNR)/NADPH branch of the redox network, the thioredoxin branch and from reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in a high diversity of responses that are able to adjust photosynthesis, as well as poising and antioxidant systems accordingly in each specific situation. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) represents a central step in CO(2) reduction and in carbohydrate oxidation involving both forms of energy, namely NAD(P)H and ATP, with its various isoforms that are located in plastids, cytosol and nucleus. GAPDH is used as an example to demonstrate complexity, flexibility and robustness of the regulatory redox network in plants. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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Scheibe R, Dietz K-J. Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells. Plant Cell & Environment. 2012;35(2):202-216.
Scheibe, R., & Dietz, K. - J. (2012). Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells. Plant Cell & Environment, 35(2), 202-216. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3040.2011.02319.x
Scheibe, R., and Dietz, K. - J. (2012). Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells. Plant Cell & Environment 35, 202-216.
Scheibe, R., & Dietz, K.-J., 2012. Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells. Plant Cell & Environment, 35(2), p 202-216.
R. Scheibe and K.-J. Dietz, “Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells”, Plant Cell & Environment, vol. 35, 2012, pp. 202-216.
Scheibe, R., Dietz, K.-J.: Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells. Plant Cell & Environment. 35, 202-216 (2012).
Scheibe, Renate, and Dietz, Karl-Josef. “Reduction-oxidation network for flexible adjustment of cellular metabolism in photoautotrophic cells”. Plant Cell & Environment 35.2 (2012): 202-216.
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